Category Archives: Design Diary

Design Diary: Girl’s Study by Erin Gates

Elements of Style blogger and interior designer Erin Gates designed this lovely work space for a nine-year-old girl  in Newton, Mass. Gates decorated most of the rooms in the family’s house, which are featured in her book, but recently went back to update this room. I wrote about it in a StyleWatch column for the Boston Globe Magazine, published this past Sunday. More decor details and sourcing links (some of which are StyleCarrot partners) included here. The beautiful photos are by Boston-based photographer Sarah Winchester.

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The goal was to create a space sweet enough for a young girl, but modern enough that guests would feel comfortable there (and so she wouldn’t quickly outgrow it). The starting point was the existing purple/grey wall color Benjamin Moore Coastline. The color was a perfect match for the large scale, Arts & Crafts influenced Farrow & Ball Lotus wallpaper, which the client had had her eye on for some time.

A tufted grey velvet daybed from Restoration Hardware Baby & Child anchors the room. She points out, “A daybed is comfortable for reading and doesn’t take up as much room as a bed with a headboard.” (I also like this more streamlined grey velvet daybed from World Market.)

Rather than opting for more obvious silver-toned accents, Gates used gold tones for contrast. Visual Comfort’s French Library wall lamps in antique brass from Circa Lighting provide plenty of reading light and cord covers eliminated the need to hire an electrician to hard wire them.

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They found inexpensive butterfly prints, which were under $20 each, on Etsy, which Gates custom framed in gold metal frames. Gates says, “We looked for art in purple tones that we could layer on top of the wallpaper, and these have a nice, girly feel.”

Gates mixed three different pillow patterns against the dramatic pattern of the wallpaper. The European squares are a painterly geometric ikat and the smaller geometric is by Pindler & Pindler. The pairing of these prints provide a nice combination of softness and structure. Kelly Wearstler “Sea Urchin” fabric by Groundworks from Lee Jofa adds an organic element to the mix, while providing some texture.”The secret to mixing,” Gates says, “is to use a monochromatic color palette and play with scale.”

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An inexpensive gold side table echoes the finish of the brass sconces. In choosing a table height to work with the swooped arm of the daybed, Gates advises it be somewhere in the middle of the high and low point for ease of use as a nightstand and side table.

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It was important that a desk provide enough room for more than one person, so Gates positioned the white lacquer Parsons table from West Elm perpendicular to the wall. The hammered brass table lamp and the gold frame around the linen-covered pinboard from Pavona Interiors on Etsy ties in with the gold accents on the other side of the room.

Gates opted for a grey velvet side chair instead of a rolling desk chair since it would function better on the carpet. The homeowner already owned the purple pagoda pillow from the Happy Chic by Jonathan Adler collection at JCPenney.

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The tall and narrow metal bookshelf on casters from CB2 is the perfect dimension for the space between the windows, leaving a bit of breathing room on each side so the curtains don’t bunch up behind it. The family already owned the Eames rocker.

Makkas Drapery Workroom in Framingham, Mass.made the custom ivory and gray linen curtains. (They made the pillow covers too.)  “Custom drapes look so much more finished, so I always advise going custom if it’s in the budget,” says Gates. She opted for a Parisian pleat, which is the only one she uses, preferring the clean lines that are less fussy look than a traditional pleat, which fans out at the top.

Gates hung the curtain rods as high as possible, right under the crown molding, to add height, which is important in rooms with eight- or nine-foot ceilings. As for the length, she says, “I like them to just kiss the floor. Puddled drapes just collect dust.”

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Design Diary: Contemporary Beach House on Plum Island

This contemporary beach house on Plum Island in Newburyport, Mass., designed by Boston-based CBT Architects, belongs to woodworker Mark Richey and his wife Teresa Richey. I wrote about it for Boston Globe Magazine in “Taking it to the Beach” back in July 2013. With the gorgeous weather we’ve had this week in Boston, I thought it was a good chance to finally post it, with photography by Trent Bell.

The Richeys purchased the cottage shortly after having relocated their business, Mark Richey Woodworking, enjoying it for short spurts while commuting from their home in Essex. A few years later, when they were ready to downsize, the couple hired Richard Bertman of CBT Architects to transform the cottage from a casual short term retreat to a full time residence.

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Following extensive research to address coastal conservation concerns, they built a new structure on driven steel pilings atop the existing basement, which allows water and sand to move freely under and around the structure. The result is a 1,962-square foot, three-story contemporary beach house with Alaskan yellow cedar shingle siding.

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The third floor lookout tower offers a 360-degree view of the water and island. The entire room is clad in fir to resemble a ship captain’s quarters, and is Mark’s own handiwork.

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The second floor master bedroom and bath both face the ocean—this was a must-have for them.

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The main level has an open floor plan. They didn’t want it to feel like a big sterile glass and plaster box, so Bertman used a warm palette of earthy materials that echo the colors of sand and beach grass. The fireplace surround is done in a textural green stone from Iran, which is also used in the kitchen. The walls and cabinetry are a mix of quarter white oak and zebrawood veneer. The floors are porcelain tile with a wood-like texture.

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The extensive deck, which follows the natural contour of the landscape, was built around an existing dune, and is constructed of a dense tropical hardwood similar to ipe,which will weather to grey. Check out the recessed cedar hot tub on the right. The couple often enjoy soaks on cold winter mornings. (Must get one of those.)

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Mark designed and fabricated the beautiful curved bench from South American mahogany. 

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Photography by Trent Bell

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Design Diary: Historic Nantucket Home by Elizabeth Georgantas

Let’s pretend it isn’t way too cold outside for April and take a trip to Nantucket. I wrote about the renovation of a classic kitchen with industrial details in this historic Nantucket home for the Boston Globe Magazine two summers ago.

Elizabeth Georgantas of Boston-based PEG Properties & Design and her husband and business partner, Peter, renovated and restored this 4,096-square-foot “in-town” historic house on Nantucket. Built in 1765, the home is believed to have been dismantled, rebuilt, and enlarged around 1820. In designing the interiors, Georgantas was careful to respect the home’s early roots while still incorporating modern-day amenities.

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Many beautiful features of the original house remain intact, like the wide plank, heart pine flooring and the 12-over-12 windows. When Georgantas and her husband purchased the house, the beams were covered under casing and a dropped ceiling. She uncovered the beams and added a couple of extras for balance.

On-island kitchen and bath design firm Nantucket House Fitters did the kitchen cabinetry. The three-quarter-inch-thick Carrera marble countertop is from Boston area supplier Cumar Marble & Granite.

The oil-rubbed bronze industrial style pendant lights are by Thomas O’Brien for Visual Comfort and the industrial style counter stools are from Leostine. The range is from French manufacturer La Cornue’s more modestly priced CornuFe line.

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Georgantas found the hutch at Furniture Consignment, a second-hand furniture shop in Chestnut Hill and had a carpenter rework the shelving in order to accommodate the television, which is mounted on an oscillating arm. The Westmore milk glass collection is from Brimfield

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A plate wall comprised of brown & white transferware.

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The brick patio is right off the kitchen. Georgantas paired an antique French marble-topped baker’s table she discovered online with vintage-inspired steel chairs. A giant clamshell planted with succulents doesn’t require much upkeep.

Rather than replacing the white cedar shingles, Georgantas had the exterior of the house power-washed, a decision that not only cut costs, but kept building materials out of landfills. Georgantas says, “We try to do as much possible to be green when we build.”

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The period-style dining room has a long worn-wood table, tall ladder back chairs and a pair of historic oil portraits.

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The original owners, Mary (Coffin) Starbuck and her husband Nathaniel, called the Parliament House. The pair led the Quaker movement on Nantucket, and the first meetings were held in their living room.

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An Oriental area rug adds color layered over a neutral, beach-appropriate sisal rug. About the furniture Georgantas says, “I didn’t need the furnishings to be historically accurate. I like the blend of comfortable, simple, current day furniture and period artwork.”

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Rich wood furniture and accessories with simple lines, along with the thoroughly present day yet charming white sofa are comfortable yet perfectly in place in this historic Nantucket house.

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The family room has a modern patterned rug, rustic wood coffee table, old-fashioned clear glass table lamp, and comfortable neutral sofa.

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A gallery wall of botanical prints lines the staircase.

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An iron canopy bed seems both fresh and modern and perfectly appropriate.

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A marble-topped antique dresser holds used books and historic objects.

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Vintage luggage stacked in a bedroom provides extra storage.

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A wood framed headboard with a vaguely French flavor is upholstered in blue linen  blue and white throw pillows in a subtle floral print add a wash of color in a bedroom.

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Rattan shades add texture in a guest room while blue and white ikat pillows and throw pillows with a slightly Asian flavored floral print add color and pattern.

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An early American antique chest sits at the foot of the bed, which has an upholstered headboard with nailhead detailing.

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This bathroom has been updated with marble tile flooring and polished chrome hardware, but the antique style vanity lends an historic air.

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Built in beds and a window seat in a children’s room.

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Design Diary: Moody South End Condo by Evolve Residential

Almost two years ago Tom Egan of Evolve Residential introduced himself to me with photos of his business partner Josh Linder’s 609-square foot, parlor-level condominium in a 19th century Victorian townhouse in the South End. Since then I’ve gotten to know these guys (who are soooo nice and incredibly talented) and feature more of their work.

We included this project,photographed by Joe Keller, in the Makeover issue of Boston Globe Magazine, The similarly moody 900-square-foot two bedroom condo in the South End belongs to Linder’s friend. He steered him towards buying it, knowing it could be fab. Of course, now it is. Adding period trim, dark paint on the walls, and a mix of contemporary and traditional furnishings, Linder transformed the nondescript space into the perfect refined bachelor pad.

Linder describes it as “elegant but very masculine” saying, “We wanted to make sure when you walked in that it was obvious that a man lived here.”

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Linder treated the whole space to Evolve Residential’s signature grey walls. The medium grey walls in the living room are done in Benjamin Moore Pale Smoke. The  ventless ethanol fireplace is entirely new. Linder chose a period mantle and painted it a glossy black—Benjamin Moore Twilight Zone.

The 13-and-a-half-foot ceilings easily accommodated the Flos 2097 chandelier, about which his friend was entirely skeptical until he saw it installed. But friends don’t doubt friends, and so he kept his mouth shut until the end, when he confessed. “He gets it now,” Linder says.

Linder and the homeowner poured through his collection of photography books to come up with a fun combination of images to use on the seat backs of the French bergere chairs. These portraits, which made them smile, are both by Richard Avedon. Linder says, “We like to have one piece in every living room that is conversational.”

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Graced with tall windows, and even taller ceilings, the space is airy and the layout needed only minimal tweaking. Plus, there’s a fantastic view of the Hancock from the living room. The quilted black leather sofa on the left is a reproduction Joseph Hoffman Kubus sofa. The crushed gray velvet settee is by O. Henry House, the rug is grey sisal, and the grey lacquer coffee table is a custom piece.

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The existing cherry kitchen cabinetry needed replacing, but they kept the black granite countertops. The new black cabinets, which run all the way up to the ceiling were constructed by Kidder Blaisdell Woodworks and painted in Benjamin Moore Twilight Zone. The Moroccan inspired tile on the backsplash is from Tile Showcase and Calcutta marble tops the counter on either side of the range.

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The grey walls in the entry are painted in Benjamin Moore Hearthstone. The Empire chest is from Autrefois Antiques in Brookline and the pair of glass lamps are by Barbara Cosgrove. Hanging above is a charcoal drawing by New England artist Martha Lloyd.

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The homeowner grew up in a house with a cozy, dark wood room that he really liked, plus he has tons of books, so they transformed the second bedroom into a library with black walls. It’s Benjamin Moore Twilight Zone, the same color as the trim in the living room. Kidder Blaisdell Woodworks also did the library bookshelves.

 They used the smallest sleeper sofa they could find in a queen. It’s a stock piece from local store Circle Furniture, but they had it reupholstered in heathered Ultrasuede.  The homeowner says, “My guests say the memory foam mattress is more comfortable than their bed at home.”

The abstract is another Martha Lloyd painting. Linder says, “We endearingly call it ‘the coffee stain.'”

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There are real candles in the Rococo style gold sconces.

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The natural grass rug is from West Elm and the sleek glass desk was an online purchase.

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Linder describes the bathroom as “horrifying,” so they gutted it. They used a simple white mosaic tile on the floor with a beautiful Afghani war rug from Yayla Tribal Rugs in Cambridge, which is much more intimate and refined than bathmat.

Linder used gold sconces here too, and also added a gold leaf frame to the recessed medicine cabinet in order to bring the elegant French feel into the bathroom.

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When they demo’d  the bathroom they discovered an extra 10-inches of space behind the tub which they took advantage of to create a large walk-in shower with a frameless glass enclosure. The large-format, horizontal shower tile from Tile Showcase looks like rustic wood and the bench and shower curb are honed black granite.

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The master bedroom is a tailored and masculine cocoon done in lush fabrics, bold lighting, and elegant, unfussy furniture. The grey walls are Benjamin Moore Timber Wolf. The all metal Global Views Turned Pendant Chandelier replaced an ugly ceiling fan.

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The custom upholstered headboard has nailhead detailing. The gray bedding is Thomas Brien for Target but the throw pillows are custom. Linder says, “One pillow cost the same as the entire bedding set, but as a mix it works beautifully.” Linder found the black marble topped vintage chests at the Cambridge Antiques Market and repainted them an inky blue.

The homeowner requested total darkness for sleep so Linder mounted three thick, blackout-lined, floor-to-ceiling custom panels from Holly Hunt to the underside of the soffit. He loves it, saying, “It could be a brilliantly sunny day, and I’d never know it.”

Photos by Joe Keller

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Design Diary: Modern Tudor Renovation By Hacin + Associates

On Sunday the Boston Globe Magazine published a new larger, format magazine. The issue included an array of lifestyle pieces, including a 10-page home decor piece, “Tudor Inspired,” that I wrote about a modern Tudor renovation. Boston-based architecture and design firm Hacin + Associates, led by David Hacin, transformed a 1932 Tudor Revival in Newton, Mass., into a modern family home.

Owned by two city guys who moved from the South End with their young daughter, this modern Tudor renovation is one of my all time favorite projects. It has an open, airy interior with sleek finishes that are juxtaposed against original details, and contemporary but comfortable furnishings. Classic patterns are applied in non-traditional ways, and masculine elements mingle with feminine infusions.

I spent a morning last month talking about the project with principal David Hacin, architect Eduardo Serrate, and interior designer Jennifer Clapp to learn all about this perfectly put together home. Here are the photographs along with design background and details. If there’s anything I’ve left out that you’re curious about, just let me know.

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Photo by Trent Bell

The living room is the main gathering place for the couple and their daughter. The limestone fireplace, original to the house, was the deal maker. One of the homeowners says, “When we saw it, we felt an instant emotional attachment.” Serrate added an architectural detail above the fireplace, to extend its presence to the ceiling. The curved windows flanking the fireplace are also original.

Serrate specified sleek wood panelling on one side of the room, while Clapp used a large expanse of an open weave drapery, made by local workroom Lori Designs Custom Drapery, on the other. The home is replete with such juxtapositions: dark versus light, solid versus soft, masculine versus feminine.

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Photo by Trent Bell

The black and white hand knotted carpet from Boston rug showroom Landry & Arcari is new, but evokes an antique look. Its textural striations are a recurring motif throughout the home. Contrast stitch on the grey linen sofa adds a hand-done feel, as do the the collection of hand embroidered pillows. (Note the swirly leafy pattern of the pillows and fireplace; you’ll see similar ones later.)

The home’s overall color palette was informed by traditional Tudor architecture. The style’s graphic elements, such as the tarred half timber latticework commonly found on exteriors and interior lime-washed walls inspired and guided them. “You don’t immediately perceive its influence,” says Serrate, “what you see is our interpretation.” Clapp adds, “We started with a Tudor house, so we wanted to honor its history rather than ignore it.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The Minotti “Prince” chair has a modern silhouette but traditional plaid upholstery. The hand-tufted leather DePadova Pouf Capitonné is from Boston furniture store Showroom.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The butterfly shadowboxes that flank the fireplace were made by Evolution in New York City .They’re inspired by traditional English curiosity cabinets. The homeowners and Clapp selected each individual butterfly.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Serrate covered one wall in the living room in walnut, choosing to construct the look with multiple panels and very visible seams, rather than an unbroken expanse of walnut.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The foyer does double duty as the home’s gracious gateway and makeshift Thanksgiving dining room—the homeowners seat 20 around four tables. While its large footprint didn’t change, openings to adjacent rooms were added and widened to facilitate flow and draw in natural light.

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The limestone tile-clad accent wall (Artistic Tile “Smoke”), which wraps into the kitchen for continuity, refers back to the fireplace in the living room. Clapp says, “Broad gestures like these allow for a big impact without gutting the interior.” The flooring is original quarter-sawn white oak.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The Viccarbe “Davos” bench by Jeffrey Bernett is also from Showroom. Clapp drew a template and guide for the upholsterer to show where they wanted the fade of the custom fabric to fall on the piece. The striated effect is similar to that of the living room carpet.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The tread of  the redesigned stairway is made from blocks of white oak. The blackened steel rail has exposed joinery, such as the rivets at the bottom of the balusters. The handrail is also white oak. The effect is very solid and artisan-made.

The concept of visible craftsmanship, from exposed hardware to quilting and tufting, is evident in every room of this modern Tudor renovation. Clapp says,  “We reinforced this idea, which is a predominant feature in traditional English Tudor architecture, by showing off how things are built, formed, or sewn together.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

A defined palette permeates the home. Limestone tile wraps into the kitchen, where custom walnut cabinetry echoes the walnut paneled wall in the living room. The dark grey pieces at the top bring in a graphic element and helps to separate the monolithic shapes from the ceiling so the cabinetry feels more like furniture.

A modern Tudor renovation calls for a large kitchen with a smooth flow. About the layout Serrate says, “The center island takes precedence, allowing the chef to move in a triangular pattern, unbothered by those eating or working at table or window seat.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The walnut canopy over the island provides a place to tuck recessed lighting, as well as ductwork for the hood. It also helps to create a more intimate scale, breaking up the room’s vertical elements. The Mutina ceramic floor tiles by Patricia Urquiola have a sandy texture. The kitchen opens onto the family room.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The dining room, which opens off the living room, features wood panelling in the exact style of the original (but painted white), which Serrate had recreated after having to rip out the existing panels due to asbestos. Originally the roomI was a library, with a small entry that Serrate widened, stretching it to five feet, and retaining the shape and details.

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For the ceiling Clapp chose a traditional wallpaper print, William Morris “Thistle”  in Mulberry. (Designed by John Henry Dearle it is one of only five machine-printed wallpapers produced by Morris & Co. in the early 20th century.) . It provides a subtle and unexpected splash of color and visual texture. Scroll back up and note how the leafy pattern echoes the fireplace carvings.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Clapp says, “We knew from the beginning that we wanted to use pattern as another element that was simultaneously  traditional and modern, but in a playful way, since the homeowners didn’t want the house to feel too serious.” Thus the consistent use of fun wallpaper. (You’ll see more soon.)

The Poliform “Flute” pedestal table by Roberto Barbieri purchased from Showroom is white lacquer over wood. The Moooi “Random Light” by Bertjan Pot (available online at Wayfair) is formed from resin drained yarn that is randomly coiled around an inflatable mold to create a translucent 3D fabric. Its open weave echoes the weave of the living room drapery.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The BD Barcelona “Showtime Chair” by Jaime Hayon, purchased at contemporary design showroom Casa Design Boston in SoWa, is highly customizable. These sport amethyst accents, from the leather armrests to the thread used to quilt the cushions, to the exposed exterior bolts.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The family room, which sits between the dining room and kitchen, is the most feminine room in the house. It’s also the most contemporary interpretation of the overall design concept, from the colors, textures, and silhouettes to jaunty set of the Moroso “Redondo” sofa and chairs by Patricia Urquiola. Clapp says, “This house is not just about drama, there’s a lot of comedy in it.”

The carpet, like that in the living room, is charcoal with a nubby, handcrafted vibe. The De La Espada “Lily” tables by Tokyo-based design studio Leif.designpark, are walnut with white Corian tops. The floor lamps are Flos “Glo-Ball” lamps by Jasper Morrison (available online at Lumens).

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Photo by Trent Bell

Redoing the playroom wasn’t initially part of the plan, but the folks at Hacin were so excited about designing a playroom that they did it as a surprise for the homeowners. Of course, it was greenlighted.

The couple’s old Ligne Roset “Togo” sofa by Michael Ducaroy makes for comfy seating. Clapp added a Dare Studio “Wire” table by Sean Dare and created a fun geometric pattern with Flor carpet tiles.  On the opposite polka dot wallpapered wall, inexpensive white lacquer cabinets provide toy storage.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

Child-friendly caged scones by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. line a pin board made from Homasote fiber board painted white, where superhero drawings (along with robots and pigeons) get tacked up.

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Photo by Trent Bell

It was important to the homeowners that their daughter’s room be a place she wants to spend time. She chose the aqua felt-upholstered Blu Dot “Dodu” bed herself (available online at AllModern).  In fact, “aqua” was one of her first words. Clapp says, “We wanted a few things clash in a playful way, like the faded floral wallpaper and braided patchwork rug. The Serena & Lily “Ellie” side table in ceramic with a semi-translucent white glaze holds a stack of picture books.  A simple white blackout roller shade virtually disappears when it’s down or up.

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Clapp chose Designers Guild “Mehsama” wallpaper, a dramatically scaled floral bouquet painted in monotone shades, as the backdrop for the girl’s bedroom.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The homeowners found this soft-serve ice cream photo, which hangs in their daughter’s bathroom, online.

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Mutino “Pico” tile by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec in red dot lines the girl’s bathroom.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

A small bedroom became the master closet-cum-office. The homeowners didn’t initially feel like they needed a separate dressing room, but it didn’t feel right to just add a couple of small closets to the master bedroom. When the designers pointed out that their daughter could do arts and crafts on the center island, they were sold.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The black and white “Toile” wallpaper by Tracey Kendall is a tribute to the black and white Tudor color scheme. The dense pattern of cypress trees in a landscape is a modern reinterpretation of traditional British toile, but with a slightly off kilter, dense repeat.

The Gubi 93 chair by Boris Berlin and Poul Christiansen of Komplot Design has a black metal swivel base and is fully upholstered in purple. Serrate says, “Their daughter has such a presence in this house.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Since this is more of a dressing room than a walk-in closet (not to mention an office!) the clothing couldn’t be exposed. Cabinetry with walnut accents mirror the walnut used downstairs and Mockett leather pulls are another nod to hand-craftsmanship.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The master bedroom is tailored and highly tactile, with cerused oak nightstands and nubby rug. A trio of low hanging pendants are set against laser-cut wool drapes, which echo the drapery panel in the living room. Tweed fabric wallpaper evokes men’s suiting. The homeowners are searching for just the right black and white photograph to hang.

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The circular forms embroidered on the bench upholstery—Maharam “Layers Vineyard Large” by Hella Jongerius—exhibits a breakdown in form, referring to the integrity (and in this case, studied imperfection) of craftsmanship throughout the house.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The floating vanity is made from a slab of stone that looks like wood, sourced locally at Cumar Marble & Granite. Notice the matching strip at the top of the wall too. The large format marble floor tiles are from Stone Source. A Greek key border runs inside the shower.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The airy guest room is set apart from the main rooms, behind the kitchen. Erica Wakerly “Fan” wallpaper in grey and white adds just the right amount of background pattern for the simplest white bedding. A family photo the homeowners already had but didn’t know what to do with hangs above the bed while handmade copper sconces hang on each side.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The powder room is also done in grey and white, with hand-glazed tiles and Flavor Paper “Secret Garden” wallpaper by Dan Funderburgh, featuring broken wine glasses, snakes, geese, acorns, locks, and other oddities.

D E S I G N   T E A M

Principal: David Hacin  |  Project Manager: Eduardo Serrate
Senior Interior Designer: Jennifer Clapp as  |  Interior Designer: Katelyn Miersma
General Contractor: Sleeping Dog Properties

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boston-globe-magazine-feb-8-2015

See the full story about this modern Tudor renovation.
Boston Globe Magazine
   February 8, 2015

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