Category Archives: Design Diary

Design Diary: Modern Tudor Renovation By Hacin + Associates

On Sunday the Boston Globe Magazine published a new larger, format magazine. The issue included an array of lifestyle pieces, including a 10-page home decor piece, “Tudor Inspired,” that I wrote about a modern Tudor renovation. Boston-based architecture and design firm Hacin + Associates, led by David Hacin, transformed a 1932 Tudor Revival in Newton, Mass., into a modern family home.

Owned by two city guys who moved from the South End with their young daughter, this modern Tudor renovation is one of my all time favorite projects. It has an open, airy interior with sleek finishes that are juxtaposed against original details, and contemporary but comfortable furnishings. Classic patterns are applied in non-traditional ways, and masculine elements mingle with feminine infusions.

I spent a morning last month talking about the project with principal David Hacin, architect Eduardo Serrate, and interior designer Jennifer Clapp to learn all about this perfectly put together home. Here are the photographs along with design background and details. If there’s anything I’ve left out that you’re curious about, just let me know.

hacin-living-room-with-family

Photo by Trent Bell

The living room is the main gathering place for the couple and their daughter. The limestone fireplace, original to the house, was the deal maker. One of the homeowners says, “When we saw it, we felt an instant emotional attachment.” Serrate added an architectural detail above the fireplace, to extend its presence to the ceiling. The curved windows flanking the fireplace are also original.

Serrate specified sleek wood panelling on one side of the room, while Clapp used a large expanse of an open weave drapery, made by local workroom Lori Designs Custom Drapery, on the other. The home is replete with such juxtapositions: dark versus light, solid versus soft, masculine versus feminine.

hacin-living-room-window

Photo by Trent Bell

The black and white hand knotted carpet from Boston rug showroom Landry & Arcari is new, but evokes an antique look. Its textural striations are a recurring motif throughout the home. Contrast stitch on the grey linen sofa adds a hand-done feel, as do the the collection of hand embroidered pillows. (Note the swirly leafy pattern of the pillows and fireplace; you’ll see similar ones later.)

The home’s overall color palette was informed by traditional Tudor architecture. The style’s graphic elements, such as the tarred half timber latticework commonly found on exteriors and interior lime-washed walls inspired and guided them. “You don’t immediately perceive its influence,” says Serrate, “what you see is our interpretation.” Clapp adds, “We started with a Tudor house, so we wanted to honor its history rather than ignore it.”

hacin-living-room-fireplace

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The Minotti “Prince” chair has a modern silhouette but traditional plaid upholstery. The hand-tufted leather DePadova Pouf Capitonné is from Boston furniture store Showroom.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The butterfly shadowboxes that flank the fireplace were made by Evolution in New York City .They’re inspired by traditional English curiosity cabinets. The homeowners and Clapp selected each individual butterfly.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Serrate covered one wall in the living room in walnut, choosing to construct the look with multiple panels and very visible seams, rather than an unbroken expanse of walnut.

hacin-entry-hall

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The foyer does double duty as the home’s gracious gateway and makeshift Thanksgiving dining room—the homeowners seat 20 around four tables. While its large footprint didn’t change, openings to adjacent rooms were added and widened to facilitate flow and draw in natural light.

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The limestone tile-clad accent wall (Artistic Tile “Smoke”), which wraps into the kitchen for continuity, refers back to the fireplace in the living room. Clapp says, “Broad gestures like these allow for a big impact without gutting the interior.” The flooring is original quarter-sawn white oak.

hacin-entry-stairway-2

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The Viccarbe “Davos” bench by Jeffrey Bernett is also from Showroom. Clapp drew a template and guide for the upholsterer to show where they wanted the fade of the custom fabric to fall on the piece. The striated effect is similar to that of the living room carpet.

hacin-entry-rail-detail

Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The tread of  the redesigned stairway is made from blocks of white oak. The blackened steel rail has exposed joinery, such as the rivets at the bottom of the balusters. The handrail is also white oak. The effect is very solid and artisan-made.

The concept of visible craftsmanship, from exposed hardware to quilting and tufting, is evident in every room of this modern Tudor renovation. Clapp says,  “We reinforced this idea, which is a predominant feature in traditional English Tudor architecture, by showing off how things are built, formed, or sewn together.”

hacin-contemporary-kitchen

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

A defined palette permeates the home. Limestone tile wraps into the kitchen, where custom walnut cabinetry echoes the walnut paneled wall in the living room. The dark grey pieces at the top bring in a graphic element and helps to separate the monolithic shapes from the ceiling so the cabinetry feels more like furniture.

A modern Tudor renovation calls for a large kitchen with a smooth flow. About the layout Serrate says, “The center island takes precedence, allowing the chef to move in a triangular pattern, unbothered by those eating or working at table or window seat.”

hacin-contemporary-kitchen-island

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The walnut canopy over the island provides a place to tuck recessed lighting, as well as ductwork for the hood. It also helps to create a more intimate scale, breaking up the room’s vertical elements. The Mutina ceramic floor tiles by Patricia Urquiola have a sandy texture. The kitchen opens onto the family room.

hacin-dining-room

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The dining room, which opens off the living room, features wood panelling in the exact style of the original (but painted white), which Serrate had recreated after having to rip out the existing panels due to asbestos. Originally the roomI was a library, with a small entry that Serrate widened, stretching it to five feet, and retaining the shape and details.

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For the ceiling Clapp chose a traditional wallpaper print, William Morris “Thistle”  in Mulberry. (Designed by John Henry Dearle it is one of only five machine-printed wallpapers produced by Morris & Co. in the early 20th century.) . It provides a subtle and unexpected splash of color and visual texture. Scroll back up and note how the leafy pattern echoes the fireplace carvings.

hacin-dining-rom-facing-shelves

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Clapp says, “We knew from the beginning that we wanted to use pattern as another element that was simultaneously  traditional and modern, but in a playful way, since the homeowners didn’t want the house to feel too serious.” Thus the consistent use of fun wallpaper. (You’ll see more soon.)

The Poliform “Flute” pedestal table by Roberto Barbieri purchased from Showroom is white lacquer over wood. The Moooi “Random Light” by Bertjan Pot (available online at Wayfair) is formed from resin drained yarn that is randomly coiled around an inflatable mold to create a translucent 3D fabric. Its open weave echoes the weave of the living room drapery.

hacin-dining-room-chair

Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The BD Barcelona “Showtime Chair” by Jaime Hayon, purchased at contemporary design showroom Casa Design Boston in SoWa, is highly customizable. These sport amethyst accents, from the leather armrests to the thread used to quilt the cushions, to the exposed exterior bolts.

hacin-family-room

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The family room, which sits between the dining room and kitchen, is the most feminine room in the house. It’s also the most contemporary interpretation of the overall design concept, from the colors, textures, and silhouettes to jaunty set of the Moroso “Redondo” sofa and chairs by Patricia Urquiola. Clapp says, “This house is not just about drama, there’s a lot of comedy in it.”

The carpet, like that in the living room, is charcoal with a nubby, handcrafted vibe. The De La Espada “Lily” tables by Tokyo-based design studio Leif.designpark, are walnut with white Corian tops. The floor lamps are Flos “Glo-Ball” lamps by Jasper Morrison (available online at Lumens).

hacin-playroom

Photo by Trent Bell

Redoing the playroom wasn’t initially part of the plan, but the folks at Hacin were so excited about designing a playroom that they did it as a surprise for the homeowners. Of course, it was greenlighted.

The couple’s old Ligne Roset “Togo” sofa by Michael Ducaroy makes for comfy seating. Clapp added a Dare Studio “Wire” table by Sean Dare and created a fun geometric pattern with Flor carpet tiles.  On the opposite polka dot wallpapered wall, inexpensive white lacquer cabinets provide toy storage.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

Child-friendly caged scones by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. line a pin board made from Homasote fiber board painted white, where superhero drawings (along with robots and pigeons) get tacked up.

hacin-girls-bedroom

Photo by Trent Bell

It was important to the homeowners that their daughter’s room be a place she wants to spend time. She chose the aqua felt-upholstered Blu Dot “Dodu” bed herself (available online at AllModern).  In fact, “aqua” was one of her first words. Clapp says, “We wanted a few things clash in a playful way, like the faded floral wallpaper and braided patchwork rug. The Serena & Lily “Ellie” side table in ceramic with a semi-translucent white glaze holds a stack of picture books.  A simple white blackout roller shade virtually disappears when it’s down or up.

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Clapp chose Designers Guild “Mehsama” wallpaper, a dramatically scaled floral bouquet painted in monotone shades, as the backdrop for the girl’s bedroom.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The homeowners found this soft-serve ice cream photo, which hangs in their daughter’s bathroom, online.

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Mutino “Pico” tile by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec in red dot lines the girl’s bathroom.

hacin-dressing-room-island

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

A small bedroom became the master closet-cum-office. The homeowners didn’t initially feel like they needed a separate dressing room, but it didn’t feel right to just add a couple of small closets to the master bedroom. When the designers pointed out that their daughter could do arts and crafts on the center island, they were sold.

hacin-dressing-room-desk

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The black and white “Toile” wallpaper by Tracey Kendall is a tribute to the black and white Tudor color scheme. The dense pattern of cypress trees in a landscape is a modern reinterpretation of traditional British toile, but with a slightly off kilter, dense repeat.

The Gubi 93 chair by Boris Berlin and Poul Christiansen of Komplot Design has a black metal swivel base and is fully upholstered in purple. Serrate says, “Their daughter has such a presence in this house.”

hacin-dressing-room-cabinetry

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Since this is more of a dressing room than a walk-in closet (not to mention an office!) the clothing couldn’t be exposed. Cabinetry with walnut accents mirror the walnut used downstairs and Mockett leather pulls are another nod to hand-craftsmanship.

hacin-master-bedroom

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The master bedroom is tailored and highly tactile, with cerused oak nightstands and nubby rug. A trio of low hanging pendants are set against laser-cut wool drapes, which echo the drapery panel in the living room. Tweed fabric wallpaper evokes men’s suiting. The homeowners are searching for just the right black and white photograph to hang.

layers-vineyard-large-by-hella-jongerius

The circular forms embroidered on the bench upholstery—Maharam “Layers Vineyard Large” by Hella Jongerius—exhibits a breakdown in form, referring to the integrity (and in this case, studied imperfection) of craftsmanship throughout the house.

hacin-master-bathroom

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The floating vanity is made from a slab of stone that looks like wood, sourced locally at Cumar Marble & Granite. Notice the matching strip at the top of the wall too. The large format marble floor tiles are from Stone Source. A Greek key border runs inside the shower.

hacin-guest-room

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The airy guest room is set apart from the main rooms, behind the kitchen. Erica Wakerly “Fan” wallpaper in grey and white adds just the right amount of background pattern for the simplest white bedding. A family photo the homeowners already had but didn’t know what to do with hangs above the bed while handmade copper sconces hang on each side.

hacin-gray-guest-bathroom

Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The powder room is also done in grey and white, with hand-glazed tiles and Flavor Paper “Secret Garden” wallpaper by Dan Funderburgh, featuring broken wine glasses, snakes, geese, acorns, locks, and other oddities.

D E S I G N   T E A M

Principal: David Hacin  |  Project Manager: Eduardo Serrate
Senior Interior Designer: Jennifer Clapp as  |  Interior Designer: Katelyn Miersma
General Contractor: Sleeping Dog Properties

F L O O R   P L A N

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hacin-floor-plan-key

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boston-globe-magazine-feb-8-2015

See the full story about this modern Tudor renovation.
Boston Globe Magazine
   February 8, 2015

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Design Diary: citizenM Hotels

I used to write the “Destination Design” column for Design Milk, and I keep “Hotel Style” Pinterest board, but lately I haven’t been keeping up on all the best new hotels. That’s not to say that I don’t welcome the chance to stay somewhere fabulous, or at the very least, blog about it. I was glad to hear about citizenM hotels, an innovative and budget-friendly, but style heavy, international chain of design hotels.

The New York Times described the citizenM hotel as “a cross between a style-conscious boutique and a pod hotel.” The Dutch company, led by Rattan Chadha, a New Delhi-born entrepreneur who sold his Dutch clothing company, Mexx, to Liz Claiborne in 2001, cuts costs but cultivates a hip vibe. citizenM stands for “citizen mobility.”

According to an article in Inc. Magazine, Chadha came up with the concept from observing how the young designers who worked for him at Mexx craved cool hotels, though not necessarily overtly luxurious ones. He tells Inc., “I wanted to create a hybrid: great style for a price a 25-year-old designer could afford. That concept existed in fashion but not in hotels.” 

Dutch architectural firm Concrete designed this design hotel concept. The rooms are individual modules prefabricated in their own factory, then stacked shipping container style. The rooms are all the same small size, with the same size windows, and all cost the same per night. They sport must-have amenities including large custom mattresses, high thread-count sheets, high pressure showers, free Wi-Fi and free bottled water.

Reservations are taken online only,  and check in and check out are done via lobby kiosks. There are no concierges, but there are “ambassadors” on hand to help if you ask. (Interestingly, they’re not from the hotel industry, but rather, at least in New York, drama students.) In place of the ubiquitous hotel  restaurant is a “canteen” that provides good quality food like sandwiches, salads, sushi, and such, open 24 hours a day.

The public areas of these design hotels are set up as communal living rooms with different types of spaces for working and lounging, furnished with sublime pieces by Swiss design company Vitra. There’s abundant and enviable high end artwork by the likes of Julian Opie, Andy Warhol, Tracey Emin, and David LaChapelle. Chadha told Wallpaper, “[The lobby is] styled to look like the living room of a very well-travelled person.”

In a number of the hotels, citizenM collaborates Amsterdam-based bookshop Mendo, the self-described as a “candy store for book aficionados.” The pop-up bookshops sell glossy books on photography, architecture, fashion, and  travel, and will send them directly to one’s home. 

The company is expanding its chain of design hotels, and has named Boston, Miami, Los Angeles, and San Francisco as target locations for new citizenM hotels. I’d love to see a citizenM hotel in Boston. Perhaps they’ll offer me a bed for a night. 

Let’s take a tour of five citizenM hotels:

Paris

The citizenM hotel Paris at the Charles De Gaulle Airport, which opened in June 2014, has 230 rooms and is the chain’s seventh location.

citizen-m-paris-charles-degaulle-exterior

A commissioned art piece by contemporary London-born artist Julien Opie covers the entire full-glass front façade of the six-story citizenM Paris. 

citizen-m-paris-charles-degaulle

More of Julien Opie’s artwork lines a black accent wall in the lobby living room, above an extended, multicolor George Nelson Marshmallow sofa.

citizen-m-paris-charles-degaulle-room

There are XL king size beds, Hansgrohe power rain showers, wood ceilings, and mid-century modern furniture. There are customizable playlists by 22tracks, a music discovery service curated by top European DJs.

citizen-m-canteen-m-paris

canteenM Paris is designed like an open kitchen.

•  •  •

Rotterdam

The 151-room citizenM hotel in Rotterdam, The Netherlands is the company’s fifth property.

citizen-m-rotterdam-lounge

The black walls are on trend, as is the hanging bicycle. Not sure if it’s art or readily available for a ride.

citizen-m-rotterdam-interior

Tablet mood pads allow guests to dim or change light colors, draw the curtains, cool the room, and control the television. Unlike most hotels, every room is equipped with a small desk with sockets to charge mobile devices no matter what the plugs origin.

 •  •  •

New York City

The first Manhattan location (another will soon go up in The Bowery) is a 230-room structure in Times Square.

citizen-m-newyork-times-square

A commissioned artwork by Jen Liu wraps around the exterior façade of citizenM NYC.  The hotel collaborated with s[edition] to allow guests select contemporary digital artwork for the displays in each room, with works  by Mark Titchner and Tracey Emin.

citizen-m-canteen-nyc

canteenM Time Square rocks a coffee house vibe. Food is locally sourced from New York suppliers.

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In addition to a wraparound terrace, the rooftop bar has a fireplace and cocktail menu curated by celeb mixologist Mayur Subbarao.

•  •  •

Amsterdam

There are two citizenM hotels in Amsterdam. One at the airport, and this one, with 215 rooms close to city center.

citizen-m-amsterdam-green-sofa

Living rooms sport comfy green couches and iMacs on long communal work (or pretend to work) tables. 

citizen-m-amsterdam-shower

Rooms have XL king beds with Italian linens and super fluffy feather pillows, and as they tout on their website, “the best showers this side of the rainforest.”

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London

The group’s fourth hotel went up in London in 2012. It’s in walking distance of the Tate Modern.

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Conference tables evoke a party atmosphere.

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A spiral staircase leads to the first floor where there are seven meeting rooms. Artwork includes pieces by Hans op de Beeck, Gavin Turk and Mario Testino.

citizen-m-london-bookstore

So many George Nelson bubble lamps.

citizen-m-london-exterior

The exterior of citizenM London features a piece of text art by Turner Prize-nominated artist Mark Titchner that says “Another World Is Possible.”

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Design Diary: Contemporary Kitchen With Folding Glass Wall

This fall I wrote about a condo in a classic 1920s brick Georgian in Brookline for the kitchen & bath issue of  Boston Globe Magazine. The story “A kitchen, deck combo lets the fun expand” features a sleek contemporary design by architect Michael Kim, who re-thought the client’s entire home. Initially a jumble of rooms and hallways indicative of life in the old days, Kim pretty much wiped the slate clean and designed a contemporary and highly single-floor family home that melds the indoors with the out. (David Cohen of Newton-based Hampden Design & Construction was the builder.)

brookline-dining-space

Splitting the home in half lengthwise, Kim positioned the three bedrooms behind the expansive living space. The new linear kitchen, designed by kitchen designer Charlotte Bogardus of Kitchens by Coco, features custom ash millwork handcrafted by Fall River-based East Bay Cabinetry, a local and more cost-effective solution than the high-end Italian kitchen cabinets they initially considered.  The layout is perfectly symmetrical, with pullout pantries anchoring each end, one flanked by an oven and microwave and one by a camouflaged 30-inch refrigerator. In the center of that wall, pocket doors hide a niche for smaller appliances and auxiliary counter space, under which are two sets of fridge and freezer drawers.

Design and color consultant Shelley Reed, who had worked with the couple on their previous home, guided them in choosing finishes and furnishings. The floor is high-grade walnut stained a rich brown, a color that simultaneously grounds the space, sets off the pale ash cabinetry. Reed purposefully combined contrasting tones of wood, all of which pop against the walls, painted Benjamin Moore White Dove. The Italian leather and chrome bar stools were $10 Craigslist finds and the weathered teak outdoor picnic table from Restoration Hardware. They flirted with the idea of splurging on Bocci lighting, but ultimately went with a more budget-friendly multi-globe chandelier from West Elm

brookline-kitchen

The 16-foot, stainless steel topped island, which the client loves even more now that it’s “beat up,” has a stainless double sink that they welded to the countertop for a seamless effect, a quick-to-cool induction cooktop, over which hovers a pared-down hood by Zepher that reads like a piece of contemporary sculpture.

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A built in desk is home to the family computer, and further down the wall there’s a built-in bar.

michael-kim-brookline-living-rom

The living room is outfitted with a modular sofa from Roche Bobois and a pair of chartreuse chairs from Ligne Roset. The shag rug is also from Ligne Roset and the concrete coffee table from West Elm. A floating shelf, which doubles as a bench, hugs the jagged wall.

brookline-deck

The kitchen island aligns perfectly with the contemporary accordion doors that open to deck, which was designed by Boston-based landscape designer Ed MacLean of Potted Up. The mahogany deck features a gas grill, a built-in wooden banquette off to one side (not pictured), and semi-circular loungers by Tropitone (the homeowners saw a similar style in Florida and had to have them) around a fire pit that can also be topped to form a table). MacLean also designed gardens around the perimeter of the house. 

Photos by Shelly Harrison

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S H O P the L O O K

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Design Diary: Sunshine-y House on the Bass River

I was very excited when photographer Dan Cutrona sent my photos of this Cape Cod cottage in South Yarmouth, which was featured in Boston Globe Magazine earlier this month.. It’s one of my favorites, and it has a swing. The all white space, punctuated with pops of yellow, is home to Newburyport-based landscape designer Trent Lloyd, and was decorated by her sister, North Carolina-based Alys S. Protzman of Alys Design. The decorating was done on a budget, which wasn’t too much of a challenge given that Lloyd favors on rustic simplicity.

Originally built for a sea captain in town and relocated to the banks of the Bass River in about 1899, the house was dark and cramped. Sticking to a white palette accented with yellow (Benjamin Moore “Bright Yellow,” to be exact), along with a few new upholstered pieces and plenty of secondhand finds, Protzman transformed the cottage into a happy summer retreat. The view is incredible; they can see the kids, who take sailing lessons, breeze by in the afternoons. The sliders open to a wide stair and brick patio.

Cape Cottage WIth Living Room Swing

Protzman’s sister and brother-in-law have three daughters, ages 9, 7 , and 4. The kid on the swing is the only boy cousin out of ten grandchildren. “There’s a lot of female energy around here,” she says. As for taking turns, each kid gets 20 swings before having to pass it on to the next. She adds, “It’s a fun way to keep the kids entertained during cocktail hour.” Protzman’s husband, who’s a woodworker, built the swing, and she painted it.

A cotton rag rug from a store in the Florida Panhandle covers the pickled white floors. The original floors were painted black with splatters of white paint. Seriously. They stripped them, and had to patch certain areas because the wood got so worn down. They stained the floorboards white rather than painting them. Protzman says, “The stain goes into the wood, so you’re less likely to see scratches; it’s more durable. Also rather than a monolithic white, it’s very beachy and driftwood-y, with a bit of warmth.”

The Restoration Hardware sofas are upholstered in an outdoor fabric by Perennials Outdoors, that feels like washed linen. Protzman commissioned an Etsy maker in France to create linen pillows with painted yellow circles. A carpenter for the contractor, LaBarge Homes, built the coffee table from reclaimed barn wood, and the tiny chairs came from the local swap shop. The table in the corner is a primitive, folk art style. Their mom jokes that it looks like it fell off a boat a hundred years ago.

A plain bulb fixture from Schoolhouse Electric dangles low, just above the side table, It’s an orangey yellow. Protzman says, “The yellows didn’t match perfectly in places, which Lloyd was a little concerned about it, but I think it adds depth; you don’t want to be too matchy matchy.”

White Living Room WIth Yellow Accents

Protzman arranged four swivel chairs around an old telephone cable spool used as a coffee table. She says, “It’s been a hit. You can swivel to the kitchen, or watch the sunset with your feet up; the setup allows for total flexibility, and the kids like to spin on them.” The idea grew out of not wanting a sofa backing up to the either the dining room or the kitchen.. She adds, “It might become my calling card. I’m so sick of pushing furniture against walls.”

Country Style All White Kitchen WIth Pops Of Yellow

In the kitchen, unfinished stools, $30 each from Amazon, got the same Benjamin Moore “Bright Yellow” paint as the lower bank of cabinetry (they kept the existing but swapped the hardware). The laminate counters were replaced with Silestone. Open shelving replaced upper cabinetry, hung against whitewashed shiplap, a material also used in the upstairs hallway. The carpenter built the freestanding Parsons-style island with IKEA butcher-block top. “It requires maintenance to avoid stains and cut marks,” says Protzman, “but my sister is fine with what she calls ‘texture’ in a summer house.” The vintage warehouse pendant is from Etsy.

Mixed Dining Room Seating In Cape Cottage

Protzman says that in trying to figure out what to do with this long and skinny space, they realized they could make it work as a dining room that would function as a multi-use space, for puzzles and projects too.

Lloyd wanted mix-and match-chair look. Protzman says, “It’s an arty collection of odd chairs.” Some are weighty; some minimal. There’s painted metal, chrome, and white leather, plus slipcovered pieces. The slipcovered bench from Serena & Lily is on casters, and seats two. Protzman found three painted blue ,metal chairs for $45 each at Scott’s, an antique mall  in Atlanta. The blue is the only other color introduced in the house.

Jeff Soderbergh, a Wellfleet-based woodworker, designed the 17-foot long dining table. It’s made out of board called “king’s wood” found in the home’s attic. (“King’s wood” boards were wide, choice planks saved to send back to the King, way back when.) Soderbergh didn’t sand the 15-inch wide boards, which were originally hand-planed, so the top is not perfectly flat. The natural curvature of the boards, the knots, and somebody’s hand-carved initials, were all left intact.

Since it’s just two-inches thick, he added an apron front for the illusion of heft. Lloyd loved the idea of doing an industrial leg, so Soderbergh sourced old, cast iron factory legs that say “Boston “on them, powder coated in white. The table was assembled on site; it took seven guys to carry the three sets of legs.

All White Cape Cod Cottage Stairway

Yellow And White Striped Tile Bathroom

This was originally a powder room with dead space, so they made it into an indoor beach shower. Lloyd and her husband are tri-athletes, so they made it into a steam shower. It’s large enough for the whole family and has a bench in there. As for the yellow and white striped tile design, Protzman says, “I thought we would put in a tiny touch of the nautical,; it reminds me of a sail.”

Yellow & White Living Room WIth Swing

During the renovation they added three sets of sliders to the exterior wall, really opening it to the outdoors. They replaced the windows over the sofa, but stuck to the traditional six-over-six configuration.

Capde Cod Cottage On The Bass River

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Design Diary: Hutker Architects Goes Graphic on Martha’s Vineyard

Hutker Architects coined a term for the style of home they’ve been busily building on Martha’s Vineyard for the past 25 years: “new regional vernacular.” Peter Cappuccino, lead architect on this project explains it as using traditional forms and familiar materials but applying them in new ways, while designing to suit a modern lifestyle.

Anne and Peter’s Vineyard home is a perfect example. I wrote about it in an article called “Vineyard Dreams” for the Cape & Islands issue of The Boston Globe Magazine on Sunday, July 20. I hope you will click through to read the story, as well as scroll down here for additional photos and notes.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

There are both water and wooded views from the steeply sloping site. Here, the deck, which connects the public spaces of the living room, kitchen, and screened porch, looks north. Here, the master bedroom deck has an amazing view towards Nantucket Sound. From the corner, one can see the steamship ferry come and go from Wood’s Hole.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

All the rooms enjoy what Cappuccino called “single width volumes,” meaning every room has at least three exposures. One ascends the stairs, enters through a single story space with a standing seam metal roof. To the right a two story space houses the kids rooms downstairs and guest suite, with a private stair. The two-story volume in the middle towards the back holds the master suite upstairs, also with private stair, and kitchen below. There’s also a family room behind that. The long room jutting into the foreground on the left is a double living room and dining room with cathedral ceiling. Decks and a screened porch run along the other side.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

Courtney Fadness, who recently moved on from Hutker, designed the home’s interiors using a high/low approach, using fun graphic pieces. The Standishes, who have three college aged kids, wanted the home to feel cozy, but with plenty of pattern and splashes of color. Fadness says, “Since it’s nestled in the trees, rather than on the beach, we could play with a more saturated palette than if we had been tied to ocean hues.”

A custom diamond pattern sisal by Merida is the base layer that runs the length of the huge room. A Moroccan-inspired dhurrie by Madeline Weinrib defines the seating area above. The sofa is a custom piece by Vioski, upholstered in a linen blend by Romo. It has a notch cut out on the back for a console table, so when you approach from dining room, you see shelves on that side. Fadnes says, “It feels more inviting, and its sculptural silhouette looks beautiful from all angles.”

Martini side tables in red by West Elm provide pops of color and the  Madison & Grow “Elizabeth” wallpaper in “Peacock on Shimmer” adds an additional graphic element and a subtle touch of teal. The Danish modern chairs with blue velvet upholstery are from 1st Dibs. The colorful glass lamp is by Tracy Glover.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The dining room, which precedes the double living room space, is dominated by a live edge wood table with a steel insert and base that the couple found on 1st Dibs, along with a statement chandelier. The wood slat and metal chairs are outdoor pieces from Terrain, and the upholstered chairs add heft and height.

The Currey & Company “Bayside” chandelier is wrought iron hand-wrapped in abaca rope; a nod to the beach. She says, “The not too serious interpretation of a traditional form adds feminine curves; it’s a nice juxtaposition to the more modern and masculine table. It also helps fill the volume of the space, without feeling heavy or obstructing views.”

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The wall on either side of the fireplace is painted teal, a color pulled from the Madison & Grow wallpaper across the room. The chairs have a nice back, so can be oriented towards the first or the second seating areas. Metallic gold dot pillow from Anthropologie.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

Deeper into the space, pushing out towards the view, is the living room’s second seating area. The sofa and armchairs are Baker Furniture, upholstered in linen by Romo and a nubby brown fabric. and The assortment of reclaimed wood coffee tables are from Anthropologie, and the arc lamp from CB2.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The screened porch has sturdy teak sofas with indoor/outdoor cushions.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The kitchen is on smaller side, with a focus on the more practical aspects, The countertop is Caesarstone and the  the backsplash of stove is a river rock –painted cabinetry, tom Dixon pendants, the backsplash over the stove is a river rock, bringing outside elements in. The cabinetry have painted frames with frosted resin insets and the light pendants are Tom Dixon. The palette reflects the monochromatic contrast of white on dark found in several other places in the house.  The flooring in the entry and kitchen is budget- and user-friendly cork.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

“Ribbed” by Ferm Living wallpaper in the powder room again shows the play of light and dark, and also brings in organic shapes. The sink looks like hammered metal but is actually porcelain. The homeowners found the mirror. A limestone counter sits atop a bamboo vanity that’s the same color as the bamboo floor. The Kohler single handle faucet is brushed nickel.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The kids hang in the casual family room, located behind the kitchen, to watch television.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

Anne likens the experience of her airy master bedroom to sleeping in a treehouse. All the walls, as well as the cathedral ceiling, are painted pale blue, as it were a continuation of the horizon. Graphic rug by Dwell Studio.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The reclaimed wood bed and the reclaimed pine plank nightstands are from the Sundance Catalog. The large table lamps from Horchow boast striations that resemble layers of sand.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The upper deck outside the master bedroom is perched above the screened porch.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The guest room is outfitted with a wood-tiled West Elm nightstand and Thomas Paul botanical pillows.

Martha's Vineyard Home By Hutker Architects

The girls bedroom has bedding by John Robshaw.

Photography by Ken Richardson

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