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Design Diary: Moody South End Condo by Evolve Residential

Almost two years ago Tom Egan of Evolve Residential introduced himself to me with photos of his business partner Josh Linder’s 609-square foot, parlor-level condominium in a 19th century Victorian townhouse in the South End. Since then I’ve gotten to know these guys (who are soooo nice and incredibly talented) and feature more of their work.

We included this project,photographed by Joe Keller, in the Makeover issue of Boston Globe Magazine, The similarly moody 900-square-foot two bedroom condo in the South End belongs to Linder’s friend. He steered him towards buying it, knowing it could be fab. Of course, now it is. Adding period trim, dark paint on the walls, and a mix of contemporary and traditional furnishings, Linder transformed the nondescript space into the perfect refined bachelor pad.

Linder describes it as “elegant but very masculine” saying, “We wanted to make sure when you walked in that it was obvious that a man lived here.”

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Linder treated the whole space to Evolve Residential’s signature grey walls. The medium grey walls in the living room are done in Benjamin Moore Pale Smoke. The  ventless ethanol fireplace is entirely new. Linder chose a period mantle and painted it a glossy black—Benjamin Moore Twilight Zone.

The 13-and-a-half-foot ceilings easily accommodated the Flos 2097 chandelier, about which his friend was entirely skeptical until he saw it installed. But friends don’t doubt friends, and so he kept his mouth shut until the end, when he confessed. “He gets it now,” Linder says.

Linder and the homeowner poured through his collection of photography books to come up with a fun combination of images to use on the seat backs of the French bergere chairs. These portraits, which made them smile, are both by Richard Avedon. Linder says, “We like to have one piece in every living room that is conversational.”

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Graced with tall windows, and even taller ceilings, the space is airy and the layout needed only minimal tweaking. Plus, there’s a fantastic view of the Hancock from the living room. The quilted black leather sofa on the left is a reproduction Joseph Hoffman Kubus sofa. The crushed gray velvet settee is by O. Henry House, the rug is grey sisal, and the grey lacquer coffee table is a custom piece.

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The existing cherry kitchen cabinetry needed replacing, but they kept the black granite countertops. The new black cabinets, which run all the way up to the ceiling were constructed by Kidder Blaisdell Woodworks and painted in Benjamin Moore Twilight Zone. The Moroccan inspired tile on the backsplash is from Tile Showcase and Calcutta marble tops the counter on either side of the range.

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The grey walls in the entry are painted in Benjamin Moore Hearthstone. The Empire chest is from Autrefois Antiques in Brookline and the pair of glass lamps are by Barbara Cosgrove. Hanging above is a charcoal drawing by New England artist Martha Lloyd.

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The homeowner grew up in a house with a cozy, dark wood room that he really liked, plus he has tons of books, so they transformed the second bedroom into a library with black walls. It’s Benjamin Moore Twilight Zone, the same color as the trim in the living room. Kidder Blaisdell Woodworks also did the library bookshelves.

 They used the smallest sleeper sofa they could find in a queen. It’s a stock piece from local store Circle Furniture, but they had it reupholstered in heathered Ultrasuede.  The homeowner says, “My guests say the memory foam mattress is more comfortable than their bed at home.”

The abstract is another Martha Lloyd painting. Linder says, “We endearingly call it ‘the coffee stain.'”

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There are real candles in the Rococo style gold sconces.

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The natural grass rug is from West Elm and the sleek glass desk was an online purchase.

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Linder describes the bathroom as “horrifying,” so they gutted it. They used a simple white mosaic tile on the floor with a beautiful Afghani war rug from Yayla Tribal Rugs in Cambridge, which is much more intimate and refined than bathmat.

Linder used gold sconces here too, and also added a gold leaf frame to the recessed medicine cabinet in order to bring the elegant French feel into the bathroom.

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When they demo’d  the bathroom they discovered an extra 10-inches of space behind the tub which they took advantage of to create a large walk-in shower with a frameless glass enclosure. The large-format, horizontal shower tile from Tile Showcase looks like rustic wood and the bench and shower curb are honed black granite.

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The master bedroom is a tailored and masculine cocoon done in lush fabrics, bold lighting, and elegant, unfussy furniture. The grey walls are Benjamin Moore Timber Wolf. The all metal Global Views Turned Pendant Chandelier replaced an ugly ceiling fan.

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The custom upholstered headboard has nailhead detailing. The gray bedding is Thomas Brien for Target but the throw pillows are custom. Linder says, “One pillow cost the same as the entire bedding set, but as a mix it works beautifully.” Linder found the black marble topped vintage chests at the Cambridge Antiques Market and repainted them an inky blue.

The homeowner requested total darkness for sleep so Linder mounted three thick, blackout-lined, floor-to-ceiling custom panels from Holly Hunt to the underside of the soffit. He loves it, saying, “It could be a brilliantly sunny day, and I’d never know it.”

Photos by Joe Keller

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Design Diary: Boys’ Bedroom Makeover by Robin M. Anderson

On Sunday Boston Globe Magazine published a boys’ bedroom makeover I wrote called “Let’s Hear It For the Boys.”  The column features the home and work of local lifestyle blogger Robin M. Anderson, with photos by local Boston photographer Sarah Winchester of Sarah Winchester Studios, who also deserves a big thank you for pitching me this fun project.

Robin M. Anderson (she used to blog under Diary of a Yummy Mummy) lives in three bedroom condo in a converted school in Cambridge with her husband, two sons, and a guinea pig. became interested in design. When they first moved in, she hadn’t yet become interested in design, picking finishes she came to hate, and mundane furnishings, like the living room’s brown microfiber sofa. Eventually she picked up a paint brush, and since then, there’s been no stopping her.

Last September, they decided to move their 3-year-old son out of the nursery into a bedroom with his 7-year-old brother, so Anderson took the opportunity to execute a full-on boys’ bedroom makeover. She started from scratch, doing everything herself with help from the boys. The room is adorable and everything in it is affordable. Anderson says, “It’s their room, so I really wanted them to feel comfortable.” That says, she has a strict no sticker policy. “They’re allowed to put them on the back of the door, but nowhere else!”

Let’s tour Robin M. Anderson’s boys’ bedroom makeover:

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Step number one for the boys’ bedroom makeover was to paint. Anderson describes the walls’ original color as “ light Kermit green.” When they had a flood and had to repair and repaint anyway, she chose Farrow & Ball Parma Gray. The boys helped with the first coat.

She says, “Paint is my first thing because it doesn’t cost much, as long as you’re willing to put the time into it. The original paint in the condo was not well done. I realized I was repainting a color I don’t even like. Paint is amazing. Our bathroom has been like nine different colors. And the kids get into it.”

The teepee, a birthday gift when her youngest turned one, was originally set up in the nursery. Now it’s a cozy place for the boys to read. Anderson’s father won the surfboard that’s propped up in the corner in a raffle. It belonged to a well-known surfer, and he had it signed before gifting it to his first grandson.

There are five large, tall windows that needed draperies. Ten custom curtain  panels would have been really pricey, so Anderson purchased 10 white curtain panels and a few navy ones, and asked her dry cleaner to sew a strip of navy panel to the bottom of the white ones to create cost-effective, extra long colorblock draperies. “All my friends are doing this now too,” she says.

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Anderson strung the teepee with owl lights from ModCloth that once adorned the family’s Christmas tree. The dinosaurs in residence are usually found in the bathtub.

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It was important to Robin that the boys’ bedroom makeover reflect the family’s heritage and interests. A Swiss flag, framed at the Central Square Blick in Cambridge, her go-to spot for affordable framing, hangs to honor her husband’s birthplace. “He’d love to move back someday,” Anderson says.  Authentic Swiss army blankets are another nod to his heritage. She says,”You get the blankets when you join the army, which is obligatory there.”

Over the other bed, school pennant is clustered with a photo of the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps, a call out to the family’s love of skiing, and an autographed surfer photo that was a gift to her son from her dad. On the other wall, a deceptively luxe-looking red faux snakeskin frame (also done at Blick) displays a print signed by Dr. Seuss that Anderson found on a trip to New Orleans. She hopes her son will pass on to his own kids. She says, “It was my first and only legitimate art purchase.”

The shelves, which are actually floating shelves, needed brackets to accommodate the slightly curved wall here. Anderson says, “The white metal brackets looked awful, so I spray painted them navy. I’ll spray paint anything; it’s my M.O.”  She and her son painted the lower half of the wall with chalkboard paint. She struggled with the trim that caps it, going back and forth to Home Depot for supplies and assistance. She says, “It was the first time I used a level.”

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The mid-century modern style Ellipse beds from Land of Nod are layered with a mix of prints. Anderson loves pattern on her clothing and in her decor. She says, “I used as many patterns as possible without being obnoxious.” The star sheets are from Pottery Barn Kids and the whales from One King’s Lane. The pillowcase in the back, with monsters on skateboards, came from Target; her son is a big skateboarder.

Anderson was able to incorporate inexpensive second hand finds into the boys’ bedroom makeover. She bought the dresser from friends for $50, lacquered the scratched top in navy, and swapped the knobs.

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All the boys’ toys are in their room, with the exception of some Legos. Big canvas storage bins on the other side (not pictured) hold the Nerf guns and stuff. She had a closet company build out closet with shelves to accommodate all the toys. As soon as they outgrow clothing or tire of toys, Anderson ships off the stuff to her sister.

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Her older son made this baseball in an acrylic box at school, when somebody from the Red Sox visited the classroom. She says, “They dirtied the balls, signed them, and put in a box. It’s his prized possession.” Soldier bookends hold up current reading material.

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Robin Anderson and Phineas the family guinea pig at her feet.

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 Boston Globe Magazine    Sunday, February 15, 2015 

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Design Diary: Modern Tudor Renovation By Hacin + Associates

On Sunday the Boston Globe Magazine published a new larger, format magazine. The issue included an array of lifestyle pieces, including a 10-page home decor piece, “Tudor Inspired,” that I wrote about a modern Tudor renovation. Boston-based architecture and design firm Hacin + Associates, led by David Hacin, transformed a 1932 Tudor Revival in Newton, Mass., into a modern family home.

Owned by two city guys who moved from the South End with their young daughter, this modern Tudor renovation is one of my all time favorite projects. It has an open, airy interior with sleek finishes that are juxtaposed against original details, and contemporary but comfortable furnishings. Classic patterns are applied in non-traditional ways, and masculine elements mingle with feminine infusions.

I spent a morning last month talking about the project with principal David Hacin, architect Eduardo Serrate, and interior designer Jennifer Clapp to learn all about this perfectly put together home. Here are the photographs along with design background and details. If there’s anything I’ve left out that you’re curious about, just let me know.

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Photo by Trent Bell

The living room is the main gathering place for the couple and their daughter. The limestone fireplace, original to the house, was the deal maker. One of the homeowners says, “When we saw it, we felt an instant emotional attachment.” Serrate added an architectural detail above the fireplace, to extend its presence to the ceiling. The curved windows flanking the fireplace are also original.

Serrate specified sleek wood panelling on one side of the room, while Clapp used a large expanse of an open weave drapery, made by local workroom Lori Designs Custom Drapery, on the other. The home is replete with such juxtapositions: dark versus light, solid versus soft, masculine versus feminine.

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Photo by Trent Bell

The black and white hand knotted carpet from Boston rug showroom Landry & Arcari is new, but evokes an antique look. Its textural striations are a recurring motif throughout the home. Contrast stitch on the grey linen sofa adds a hand-done feel, as do the the collection of hand embroidered pillows. (Note the swirly leafy pattern of the pillows and fireplace; you’ll see similar ones later.)

The home’s overall color palette was informed by traditional Tudor architecture. The style’s graphic elements, such as the tarred half timber latticework commonly found on exteriors and interior lime-washed walls inspired and guided them. “You don’t immediately perceive its influence,” says Serrate, “what you see is our interpretation.” Clapp adds, “We started with a Tudor house, so we wanted to honor its history rather than ignore it.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The Minotti “Prince” chair has a modern silhouette but traditional plaid upholstery. The hand-tufted leather DePadova Pouf Capitonné is from Boston furniture store Showroom.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The butterfly shadowboxes that flank the fireplace were made by Evolution in New York City .They’re inspired by traditional English curiosity cabinets. The homeowners and Clapp selected each individual butterfly.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Serrate covered one wall in the living room in walnut, choosing to construct the look with multiple panels and very visible seams, rather than an unbroken expanse of walnut.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The foyer does double duty as the home’s gracious gateway and makeshift Thanksgiving dining room—the homeowners seat 20 around four tables. While its large footprint didn’t change, openings to adjacent rooms were added and widened to facilitate flow and draw in natural light.

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The limestone tile-clad accent wall (Artistic Tile “Smoke”), which wraps into the kitchen for continuity, refers back to the fireplace in the living room. Clapp says, “Broad gestures like these allow for a big impact without gutting the interior.” The flooring is original quarter-sawn white oak.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The Viccarbe “Davos” bench by Jeffrey Bernett is also from Showroom. Clapp drew a template and guide for the upholsterer to show where they wanted the fade of the custom fabric to fall on the piece. The striated effect is similar to that of the living room carpet.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The tread of  the redesigned stairway is made from blocks of white oak. The blackened steel rail has exposed joinery, such as the rivets at the bottom of the balusters. The handrail is also white oak. The effect is very solid and artisan-made.

The concept of visible craftsmanship, from exposed hardware to quilting and tufting, is evident in every room of this modern Tudor renovation. Clapp says,  “We reinforced this idea, which is a predominant feature in traditional English Tudor architecture, by showing off how things are built, formed, or sewn together.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

A defined palette permeates the home. Limestone tile wraps into the kitchen, where custom walnut cabinetry echoes the walnut paneled wall in the living room. The dark grey pieces at the top bring in a graphic element and helps to separate the monolithic shapes from the ceiling so the cabinetry feels more like furniture.

A modern Tudor renovation calls for a large kitchen with a smooth flow. About the layout Serrate says, “The center island takes precedence, allowing the chef to move in a triangular pattern, unbothered by those eating or working at table or window seat.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The walnut canopy over the island provides a place to tuck recessed lighting, as well as ductwork for the hood. It also helps to create a more intimate scale, breaking up the room’s vertical elements. The Mutina ceramic floor tiles by Patricia Urquiola have a sandy texture. The kitchen opens onto the family room.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The dining room, which opens off the living room, features wood panelling in the exact style of the original (but painted white), which Serrate had recreated after having to rip out the existing panels due to asbestos. Originally the roomI was a library, with a small entry that Serrate widened, stretching it to five feet, and retaining the shape and details.

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For the ceiling Clapp chose a traditional wallpaper print, William Morris “Thistle”  in Mulberry. (Designed by John Henry Dearle it is one of only five machine-printed wallpapers produced by Morris & Co. in the early 20th century.) . It provides a subtle and unexpected splash of color and visual texture. Scroll back up and note how the leafy pattern echoes the fireplace carvings.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Clapp says, “We knew from the beginning that we wanted to use pattern as another element that was simultaneously  traditional and modern, but in a playful way, since the homeowners didn’t want the house to feel too serious.” Thus the consistent use of fun wallpaper. (You’ll see more soon.)

The Poliform “Flute” pedestal table by Roberto Barbieri purchased from Showroom is white lacquer over wood. The Moooi “Random Light” by Bertjan Pot (available online at Wayfair) is formed from resin drained yarn that is randomly coiled around an inflatable mold to create a translucent 3D fabric. Its open weave echoes the weave of the living room drapery.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The BD Barcelona “Showtime Chair” by Jaime Hayon, purchased at contemporary design showroom Casa Design Boston in SoWa, is highly customizable. These sport amethyst accents, from the leather armrests to the thread used to quilt the cushions, to the exposed exterior bolts.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The family room, which sits between the dining room and kitchen, is the most feminine room in the house. It’s also the most contemporary interpretation of the overall design concept, from the colors, textures, and silhouettes to jaunty set of the Moroso “Redondo” sofa and chairs by Patricia Urquiola. Clapp says, “This house is not just about drama, there’s a lot of comedy in it.”

The carpet, like that in the living room, is charcoal with a nubby, handcrafted vibe. The De La Espada “Lily” tables by Tokyo-based design studio Leif.designpark, are walnut with white Corian tops. The floor lamps are Flos “Glo-Ball” lamps by Jasper Morrison (available online at Lumens).

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Photo by Trent Bell

Redoing the playroom wasn’t initially part of the plan, but the folks at Hacin were so excited about designing a playroom that they did it as a surprise for the homeowners. Of course, it was greenlighted.

The couple’s old Ligne Roset “Togo” sofa by Michael Ducaroy makes for comfy seating. Clapp added a Dare Studio “Wire” table by Sean Dare and created a fun geometric pattern with Flor carpet tiles.  On the opposite polka dot wallpapered wall, inexpensive white lacquer cabinets provide toy storage.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

Child-friendly caged scones by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. line a pin board made from Homasote fiber board painted white, where superhero drawings (along with robots and pigeons) get tacked up.

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Photo by Trent Bell

It was important to the homeowners that their daughter’s room be a place she wants to spend time. She chose the aqua felt-upholstered Blu Dot “Dodu” bed herself (available online at AllModern).  In fact, “aqua” was one of her first words. Clapp says, “We wanted a few things clash in a playful way, like the faded floral wallpaper and braided patchwork rug. The Serena & Lily “Ellie” side table in ceramic with a semi-translucent white glaze holds a stack of picture books.  A simple white blackout roller shade virtually disappears when it’s down or up.

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Clapp chose Designers Guild “Mehsama” wallpaper, a dramatically scaled floral bouquet painted in monotone shades, as the backdrop for the girl’s bedroom.

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Photo by Emily Neumann/Hacin + Associates

The homeowners found this soft-serve ice cream photo, which hangs in their daughter’s bathroom, online.

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Mutino “Pico” tile by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec in red dot lines the girl’s bathroom.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

A small bedroom became the master closet-cum-office. The homeowners didn’t initially feel like they needed a separate dressing room, but it didn’t feel right to just add a couple of small closets to the master bedroom. When the designers pointed out that their daughter could do arts and crafts on the center island, they were sold.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The black and white “Toile” wallpaper by Tracey Kendall is a tribute to the black and white Tudor color scheme. The dense pattern of cypress trees in a landscape is a modern reinterpretation of traditional British toile, but with a slightly off kilter, dense repeat.

The Gubi 93 chair by Boris Berlin and Poul Christiansen of Komplot Design has a black metal swivel base and is fully upholstered in purple. Serrate says, “Their daughter has such a presence in this house.”

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

Since this is more of a dressing room than a walk-in closet (not to mention an office!) the clothing couldn’t be exposed. Cabinetry with walnut accents mirror the walnut used downstairs and Mockett leather pulls are another nod to hand-craftsmanship.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The master bedroom is tailored and highly tactile, with cerused oak nightstands and nubby rug. A trio of low hanging pendants are set against laser-cut wool drapes, which echo the drapery panel in the living room. Tweed fabric wallpaper evokes men’s suiting. The homeowners are searching for just the right black and white photograph to hang.

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The circular forms embroidered on the bench upholstery—Maharam “Layers Vineyard Large” by Hella Jongerius—exhibits a breakdown in form, referring to the integrity (and in this case, studied imperfection) of craftsmanship throughout the house.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The floating vanity is made from a slab of stone that looks like wood, sourced locally at Cumar Marble & Granite. Notice the matching strip at the top of the wall too. The large format marble floor tiles are from Stone Source. A Greek key border runs inside the shower.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The airy guest room is set apart from the main rooms, behind the kitchen. Erica Wakerly “Fan” wallpaper in grey and white adds just the right amount of background pattern for the simplest white bedding. A family photo the homeowners already had but didn’t know what to do with hangs above the bed while handmade copper sconces hang on each side.

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Photo by Michael Stavaridis

The powder room is also done in grey and white, with hand-glazed tiles and Flavor Paper “Secret Garden” wallpaper by Dan Funderburgh, featuring broken wine glasses, snakes, geese, acorns, locks, and other oddities.

D E S I G N   T E A M

Principal: David Hacin  |  Project Manager: Eduardo Serrate
Senior Interior Designer: Jennifer Clapp as  |  Interior Designer: Katelyn Miersma
General Contractor: Sleeping Dog Properties

F L O O R   P L A N

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See the full story about this modern Tudor renovation.
Boston Globe Magazine
   February 8, 2015

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Design Diary: Contemporary Kitchen With Folding Glass Wall

This fall I wrote about a condo in a classic 1920s brick Georgian in Brookline for the kitchen & bath issue of  Boston Globe Magazine. The story “A kitchen, deck combo lets the fun expand” features a sleek contemporary design by architect Michael Kim, who re-thought the client’s entire home. Initially a jumble of rooms and hallways indicative of life in the old days, Kim pretty much wiped the slate clean and designed a contemporary and highly single-floor family home that melds the indoors with the out. (David Cohen of Newton-based Hampden Design & Construction was the builder.)

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Splitting the home in half lengthwise, Kim positioned the three bedrooms behind the expansive living space. The new linear kitchen, designed by kitchen designer Charlotte Bogardus of Kitchens by Coco, features custom ash millwork handcrafted by Fall River-based East Bay Cabinetry, a local and more cost-effective solution than the high-end Italian kitchen cabinets they initially considered.  The layout is perfectly symmetrical, with pullout pantries anchoring each end, one flanked by an oven and microwave and one by a camouflaged 30-inch refrigerator. In the center of that wall, pocket doors hide a niche for smaller appliances and auxiliary counter space, under which are two sets of fridge and freezer drawers.

Design and color consultant Shelley Reed, who had worked with the couple on their previous home, guided them in choosing finishes and furnishings. The floor is high-grade walnut stained a rich brown, a color that simultaneously grounds the space, sets off the pale ash cabinetry. Reed purposefully combined contrasting tones of wood, all of which pop against the walls, painted Benjamin Moore White Dove. The Italian leather and chrome bar stools were $10 Craigslist finds and the weathered teak outdoor picnic table from Restoration Hardware. They flirted with the idea of splurging on Bocci lighting, but ultimately went with a more budget-friendly multi-globe chandelier from West Elm

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The 16-foot, stainless steel topped island, which the client loves even more now that it’s “beat up,” has a stainless double sink that they welded to the countertop for a seamless effect, a quick-to-cool induction cooktop, over which hovers a pared-down hood by Zepher that reads like a piece of contemporary sculpture.

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A built in desk is home to the family computer, and further down the wall there’s a built-in bar.

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The living room is outfitted with a modular sofa from Roche Bobois and a pair of chartreuse chairs from Ligne Roset. The shag rug is also from Ligne Roset and the concrete coffee table from West Elm. A floating shelf, which doubles as a bench, hugs the jagged wall.

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The kitchen island aligns perfectly with the contemporary accordion doors that open to deck, which was designed by Boston-based landscape designer Ed MacLean of Potted Up. The mahogany deck features a gas grill, a built-in wooden banquette off to one side (not pictured), and semi-circular loungers by Tropitone (the homeowners saw a similar style in Florida and had to have them) around a fire pit that can also be topped to form a table). MacLean also designed gardens around the perimeter of the house. 

Photos by Shelly Harrison

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Shopping Trip: Lou & Grey

Today I’m partnering with Lou & Grey, an offshoot of Ann Taylor LOFT that elevates loungewear by using textural fabrics and on trend silhouettes to create a collection of easy living pieces with a bit of edge. There are nubby oversize popovers, drawstring pants tailored enough to wear outdoors, stripey knit moto jackets, worn denim, a multitude of leggings, and soft drapey tees.

Interspersed with the Lou & Grey clothing, which is done in a palette of grey and oatmeal, with chambray, indigo, and shots of burgundy, is delicate, on-trend jewelry (lots of triangles) by makers that include Zoe Comings from Austin and New Refined Basics from Portland. There are also colorblock canvas pouches by Bittle & Burley and amazing candles in scents of storm, charcoal, and bone in handmade ceramic pots; both makers are out of Brooklyn. In addition, there are organic beauty products, matte ceramic canisters with cork tops, herringbone throws, stacks of Kinfolk magazines, and a carefully edited selection of books. 

The decor is perfect, with white wood plank floors, copper pipe clothes rails, table bases, and pendants, marble slabs, oak shelving, linen fitting room curtains, and leather hooks. It actually looks a lot like a gorgeous South End condo that I wrote about in the Boston Globe Magazine last Sunday. Lou & Grey is pretty much Pinterest come alive.

I visited the new Lou & Grey retail space at the Natick Mall outside Boston. (There’s a store open in Westport, CT too. I’ll definitely stop by when I’m there for Thanksgiving.) Let’s take the tour.

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L O O K S available O N L I N E

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S H O P P I N G
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1 Treadstripe Moto Jacket + White Signature Tee

2 Specklestripe Popover + Spacedye Maxi Skirt

3 Burgundy Zippy Tunic + Grey Skinny Jean

4 Pebbled Crepe Popover + Chambray Jogger Pant

5 Mixup Tee + Twill Drawstring Pant

Shop l o u n g e y  l o o k s from L O U & G R E Y  >

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