Tag Archives: Boston Globe Magazine

Design Diary: Contemporary Kitchen With Folding Glass Wall

This fall I wrote about a condo in a classic 1920s brick Georgian in Brookline for the kitchen & bath issue of  Boston Globe Magazine. The story “A kitchen, deck combo lets the fun expand” features a sleek contemporary design by architect Michael Kim, who re-thought the client’s entire home. Initially a jumble of rooms and hallways indicative of life in the old days, Kim pretty much wiped the slate clean and designed a contemporary and highly single-floor family home that melds the indoors with the out. (David Cohen of Newton-based Hampden Design & Construction was the builder.)

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Splitting the home in half lengthwise, Kim positioned the three bedrooms behind the expansive living space. The new linear kitchen, designed by kitchen designer Charlotte Bogardus of Kitchens by Coco, features custom ash millwork handcrafted by Fall River-based East Bay Cabinetry, a local and more cost-effective solution than the high-end Italian kitchen cabinets they initially considered.  The layout is perfectly symmetrical, with pullout pantries anchoring each end, one flanked by an oven and microwave and one by a camouflaged 30-inch refrigerator. In the center of that wall, pocket doors hide a niche for smaller appliances and auxiliary counter space, under which are two sets of fridge and freezer drawers.

Design and color consultant Shelley Reed, who had worked with the couple on their previous home, guided them in choosing finishes and furnishings. The floor is high-grade walnut stained a rich brown, a color that simultaneously grounds the space, sets off the pale ash cabinetry. Reed purposefully combined contrasting tones of wood, all of which pop against the walls, painted Benjamin Moore White Dove. The Italian leather and chrome bar stools were $10 Craigslist finds and the weathered teak outdoor picnic table from Restoration Hardware. They flirted with the idea of splurging on Bocci lighting, but ultimately went with a more budget-friendly multi-globe chandelier from West Elm

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The 16-foot, stainless steel topped island, which the client loves even more now that it’s “beat up,” has a stainless double sink that they welded to the countertop for a seamless effect, a quick-to-cool induction cooktop, over which hovers a pared-down hood by Zepher that reads like a piece of contemporary sculpture.

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A built in desk is home to the family computer, and further down the wall there’s a built-in bar.

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The living room is outfitted with a modular sofa from Roche Bobois and a pair of chartreuse chairs from Ligne Roset. The shag rug is also from Ligne Roset and the concrete coffee table from West Elm. A floating shelf, which doubles as a bench, hugs the jagged wall.

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The kitchen island aligns perfectly with the contemporary accordion doors that open to deck, which was designed by Boston-based landscape designer Ed MacLean of Potted Up. The mahogany deck features a gas grill, a built-in wooden banquette off to one side (not pictured), and semi-circular loungers by Tropitone (the homeowners saw a similar style in Florida and had to have them) around a fire pit that can also be topped to form a table). MacLean also designed gardens around the perimeter of the house. 

Photos by Shelly Harrison

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Shopping Trip: Lou & Grey

Today I’m partnering with Lou & Grey, an offshoot of Ann Taylor LOFT that elevates loungewear by using textural fabrics and on trend silhouettes to create a collection of easy living pieces with a bit of edge. There are nubby oversize popovers, drawstring pants tailored enough to wear outdoors, stripey knit moto jackets, worn denim, a multitude of leggings, and soft drapey tees.

Interspersed with the Lou & Grey clothing, which is done in a palette of grey and oatmeal, with chambray, indigo, and shots of burgundy, is delicate, on-trend jewelry (lots of triangles) by makers that include Zoe Comings from Austin and New Refined Basics from Portland. There are also colorblock canvas pouches by Bittle & Burley and amazing candles in scents of storm, charcoal, and bone in handmade ceramic pots; both makers are out of Brooklyn. In addition, there are organic beauty products, matter ceramic canisters with cork tops, herringbone throws, stacks of Kinfolk magazines, and a carefully edited selection of books. 

The decor is perfect, with white wood plank floors, copper pipe clothes rails, table bases, and pendants, marble slabs, oak shelving, linen fitting room curtains, and leather hooks. It actually looks a lot like a gorgeous South End condo that I wrote about in the Boston Globe Magazine last Sunday. Lou & Grey is pretty much Pinterest come alive.

I visited the new Lou & Grey retail space at the Natick Mall outside Boston. (There’s a store open in Westport, CT too. I’ll definitely stop by when I’m there for Thanksgiving.) Let’s take the tour.

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L O O K S available O N L I N E

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S H O P P I N G
please note that these are affiliate links

1 Treadstripe Moto Jacket + White Signature Tee

2 Specklestripe Popover + Spacedye Maxi Skirt

3 Burgundy Zippy Tunic + Grey Skinny Jean

4 Pebbled Crepe Popover + Chambray Jogger Pant

5 Mixup Tee + Twill Drawstring Pant

Shop l o u n g e y  l o o k s from L O U & G R E Y  >

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Get the Look: Upholstered Swivel Chairs In Every Color

This Sunday was the last 2014 Boston Globe Magazine home decor issue. The theme was “Make It Your Own.” I wrote a several features for it (I will blog about La Tartine Gourmande blogger Bea Peltre’s colorful home soon and well as a South End condo with industrial style decor.) They’re two of my all time favorite spaces about which I’ve written.

In addition to the features, I put together the StyleWatch product page, which highlighted seven colorful upholstered swivel chairs. Swivel chairs are a perennial favorite of interior designers. A pair of swivel chairs can bridge the two separate conversation areas in an oversize living room. In the family room, swivel chairs can face either the sofas or the television, allowing for multi-function flexibility. Designer Alys Protzman, who decorated this yellow and white cottage on Cape Cod, likes to place a cluster of swivel chairs around a table to create an entire seating area that delights kids and adults. (Spin, spin, spin.)

There are lots of different types of swivel chairs available for living spaces, including mod styles on pedestals. Other than the one Jonathan Adler swivel chair I included here (because I just couldn’t resist it), these upholstered swivel chairs resemble traditional easy chairs that one would not expect to rotate. These upholstered swivel chairs would work in any room, whether to serve two functions near a television or open kitchen, or used as a reading chair by a window in the bedroom. (Or just use it to pile clothing on and swivel it away from you when it becomes overloaded.)

Here are 45 upholstered swivel chairs in every color as well as some patterns.

 

Modern Taupe Neutral Upholstered Swivel Chairs

Modern Grey Upholstered Swivel Chairs

Modern Blue Turquoise Upholstered Swivel Chairs


Modern Green Upholstered Swivel Chairs

Modern Yellow Orange Upholstered Swivel Chairs

Modern Pink Red Upholstered Swivel Chairs

S H O P P I N G

1 Eos Swivel Chair, $999 at Room & Board.
2 Willy Swivel Armchair by Poltrona Frau at Switch Modern.
3 Alfosa Cow Print Swivel Chair, $278.54 at Wayfair.
4 Blakely Brown Swivel Chair, $480 at Bellacor.
5 Agathos Swivel Armchair by Antonio Citterio at Switch Modern.
6 Sutton Chevron Swivel Chairi, $499.99 at Bellacor.
7 Manhattan Swivel Stool, $986 at Seagrass Home.
8 Baxter Swivel Chair, $2,595 at Jonathan Adler.
9 Lazar Scroll Corkscrew Left Swivel Chair, $806 at AllModern.
10 Felix Chair by Mitchell Gold+Bob Williams, $2,115 at Bloomingdale’s.
11 Felix Swivel Chair, $1,545 at Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.
12 Penta Swivel Chair by Viccarbe, $1,697 at Switch Modern.
13 Hugo Swivel Chair, $999 at Room & Board.
14 Feelin’ Groovy Swivel Chairs at Thayer Coggin.
15 Rothko Swivel Chair, $799.95 at Boston Interiors.
16 Milo Baughman Style Barrel Chairs, $895/pair at Chairish.
17 Duffield Swivel Chair in Brushstrokes, $799 at West Elm.
18 Duffield Swivel Chair in Ikat Chevron, $799 at West Elm.
19 Floral Arm Chair, $1,900 at 1st Dibs.
20 Luxe Slipcovered Swivel Chair, $1,299 at Crate & Barrel.
21 Azimut Swivel Chair by Marco Fumagalli at Roche Bobois.
22 Anda Swivel Chair at Ligne Roset.
23 Reid Swivel Armchair, $2,720 at DWR.
24 Brisbane in Sunbrella Canvas, $1,299 at Room & Board.
25 Swivel Ottoman at Ligne Roset.
26 Celeste Swivel Chair, $749 at Room & Board.
27 Axis II Leather Swivel Chair, $1,899 at Crate & Barrel.
28 Serene Slipcovered Swivel Chair, $1,499 at Crate & Barrel.
29 Linda Swivel Chair, $799 at Circle Furniture
30 Anda Swivel Chair at Ligne Roset.
31 Morgan Track Arm Swivel Glider, $1,089 at Ethan Allen.
32 Colby Swivel Club Chair by Elegant Home Fashions, $496 at Bellacor.
33 Stockholm Swivel Chair, $399 at IKEA.
34 1980s Directional Swivel Lounge Chair, $3,850 at 1st Dibs.
35 Talia Swivel Chair, $1,399 at Crate & Barrel.
36 Nico Return Leather Swivel Chair, $2,545 at Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.
37 Crest Swivel Chair in Sunbrella Canvas, $799 at Room & Board.
38 Modern Swivel Chair 805, $953 at Contemporary Furniture.
39 Mid-Century Custom Swivel Arm Chairs, $2,850/pair at Chairish.
40 Pumpkin Chair by Pierre Paulin at Ligne Roset.
41 Facett Swivel Armchair at Ligne Roset.
42 Fresco Swivel Occasional Chair at LaZBoy.
43 Otis Swivel Chair, $699 at Room & Board.
44 Barrel Back Swivel Lounge Chair, $2,850/pair at 1st Dibs.
45 Hathaway Swivel Glicer, $1,099 at Crate & Barrel.

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Fine Print: Erin Gates’ Elements of Style Book

Erin Gates sent me an advance copy of her new, very first design book, Elements of Style: Designing A Home & A Life. I’ve been browsing through it for the last couple of weeks, thoroughly enjoying the photos of the rooms she decorated for herself and clients, studying her style charts, and catching up on her life. The tone is easy, breezy, much like her blog, with plenty of personal tidbits interwoven through her design adventures and accomplishments.

Erin’s come a long way since I first met her, on assignment for Boston Globe Magazine in early 2009 after she sent me scouting shots of  the place she and Andrew rented in J.P. It landed her on the cover, and it’s still one of my favorite stories, not just because Erin and her house looked amazing (thanks Eric Roth for the excellent photos), but because Erin was full of enthusiasm and money saving tips.

Her blog and business have exploded and her design skills honed, while her excellent attitude and work ethic prevail. Congratulations Erin Gates!

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Elements of Style: Designing a Home & a Life by Erin Gates
Available October 7, 2014 (Simon & Schuster) $22.14

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Photo by Michael Parteni

Erin’s used this buffet over and again. She bought it for $75 at an estate sale and painted the inside turquoise (you can see that iteration in Erin’s place in Jamaica Plain, which I wrote about for Boston Globe Magazine, March 2009.) She went orange for the South End. Now it’s lined with malachite wallpaper.

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Photo by Michael J. Lee

This is my favorite room. I’ve long been a sucker for a library dining room with Saarinen table and a fireplace. The sheepskin rugs nesle perfectly into those acrylic chairs from IKEA. The client stuffed the fireplace with little logs, which add some rustic texture; plus the circles are an excellent contrast to the stripes on the rug.

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Photo by Michael Partenio

A sunroom with violet ikat cushions on barley twist chairs and Buddha on custom made brass base.

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Photo by Michael J. Lee

Love this cerulean blue wall behind the banquette upholstered in the ever popular Chiang Mai print by Schumacher. Those Cherner chairs work well with the fabric’s twisting design and earthy colors.

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Erin provides some charts with formulas for achieving different styles.

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Erin’s favorite paint colors. You’ll have to buy the book to get the exact names. Ok, I’ll give you one: Benjamin Moore Palladian Blue.

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Photo by Michael Partenio

I love how despite the graphic black & white rug and bedding, Erin’s guest room is totally feminine. Pale pink walls (Benjamin Moore Blanched Coral), a starburst mirror, and mirrored side tables will do that. Swiss dots + a boho throw + Nordic rug + Hollywood Regency glam. And somehow it all works.

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Photo by Michael J. Lee

This bedroom is interesting too, with its tufted headboard, chocolate brown linens, Asian-themed toile wallpaper and fretwork bookshelves, plus a leopard print bench.

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Photo by Sean Litchfield

Nursery with a black accent wall went viral on Pinterest.

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Photo by Michael J. Lee

Oh, this Madeline Weinrib rug again, this time in brown. It seems to work everywhere! (Tip: IKEA makes a black & white version.) I generally don’t like tan stone (only contractors do!) but Erin makes it work in this space where they’re stuck with it.

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 Photo by Sarah Winchester

Erin’s parents Connecticut home. I wrote all about her mom’s garden for Boston Globe Magazine, April 2013.

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Photo by Michael J. Lee

Erin and Andrew Gates with the doggies.

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G E T  the  L O O K

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Shopping Trip: Brimfield Antiques Market With Abby Ruettgers of Farm & Fable

Back in May 2009, I went to Brimfield for the first time after reading about it for years in Martha Stewart Living. That it took me six years after moving to Boston to get there is kind of ridiculous, but finally, prompted by an assignment for Boston Globe Magazine, I trailed interior designer and shop owner Jill Goldberg of Hudson. You can see Jill Goldberg’s top ten Brimfield vendor picks here.

This year, Boston’s most darling publicist Nicole Kanner suggested I trail Abby Ruettgers, who owns the new South End boutique Farm & Fable, where she sells culinary antiques, vintage cookbooks, and new tabletop items. (She also hosts cooking & drinking classes in the basement and has two enormous friendly dogs.) The Boston Globe’s Food & Dining section editor thought it was a great idea, so I went with Abby and Nicole’s sweet assistant Liz Greene to Brimfield in May.

Today, the article In Brimfield, Hunt is on for Culinary Collectibles appeared in the Boston Globe. Be sure to click through to read it to learn her strategies and tips for successful hunting. Here are my photos from the day.


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Abby Ruettgers of Farm & Fable

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V E N D O R S

For: Wooden crates, lockers, scales, and lanterns.
Shop: Bill Ziobro, Found Again Treasures, Sturtevants North.

For: Jadeite, Fiesta ware, cocktail glasses and shakers.
Shop: Joe Keller and David Ross, Keller & Ross, Quaker Acres, Booth L3.

For: Vintage advertising pamphlets, magazines, and books.
Shop: Joseph Prior, Quaker Acres, Booths 25 and 26.

For: Culinary antiques including Pyrex and kitchen tools.
Shop Nancy and Richard Lucier, The Good Home, Quaker Acres, Booth 82.

For: Wooden bobbins, spools, and such from textile factories.
Shop: Dennis and Judy Perry, The Meadows, Booth 50.

If you’re in Boston, stop by Abby’s boutique Farm & Fable,
located at Shawmut & Milford in the South End.

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All photos by Marni Elyse Katz for StyleCarrot

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Design Diary: A Condo Built for Wine

For last year’s Boston Globe Magazine Kitchens & Baths issue, I profiled one of the more interesting projects I’ve researched—a condo for which the starting point was the homeowners’ wine collection. Designed by Thomas White of  ACTWO Architects and built by Merz Construction, this 2,100-square-foot three bedroom in a high-rise overlooking Boston Common obviously did not come with a wine cellar. Here’s a detailed look, photographed by Greg Premru.

Entry Boston Condo South End

The entry area is defined by the same tile used in the kitchen, a ceramic tile by Tau that resembles Corten steel. To the right, interior designer Manuel de Santaren, whom the couple had worked with on prior projects, suggested cutting a five-inch deep niche for their Fornasetti screen, which was purchased by the husband’s mother in the 1950s. To the left is the hallway with the wine. Straight ahead is the dining area, partially concealed by a fixed metal screen.

The “Athos” dining table by B&B Italia are from Montage in Boston. The “Lirica” chairs by Domitalia are from Italian Interiors in Watertown. The Light blue wool rug with gold silk pattern is from Landry & Arcari in Boston. The light fixture is the Artemide Triple Linear Logico Classical.

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Wanting a textured, transparent material other than glass, White devised a curtain of stainless steel rings that’s normally used in commercial applications, like cladding on airport facades. He brought in Jonathan Merz of Merz Construction early in the process, and they collaborated on the installation, using stainless parts they had had specially fabricated. 

The photograph at the end of the hallway, by Victor Schragar, pictures books in varying stages of focus, wrapped in paper to resemble color fields. The couple purchased it from the Bernard Toale Gallery in the South End. They refinished the existing oak floor in medium brown. 

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The homeowner wanted to be sure that displaying the didn’t come off as ostentatious, or look like a bar at a trendy restaurant. White offered this wine storage solution: an illuminated wall of wine with floor-to-ceiling glass sliding doors that could accommodate almost 30 cases of wine. It became the starting point for the overall design of the home, and its focal point.

After experimenting with costly custom ideas for what would hold the wine bottles, they chose an off-the-shelf metal rack that the homeowner found online.

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White says, “We realized that illuminating the bottles could be artistic, and decided to make a whole wall glow.”  When the doors are rolled shut, it’s not obvious what’s behind there. The homeowner says that it takes a while before people realize it’s wine. As for the mesh screen, he says, ‘“At night, light skims down the screen, transforming it into a sparkly wall.”

Lighting is at the top, behind a white pre-finished aluminum panel. There’s also a small exhaust fan that ventilates the heat that builds up from the lights. They took great pains to hide the ventilation, ducts, lighting, etc. and to be sure there were no unsightly shadows. Handles are stainless steel inset in the glass.

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Standing in the kitchen, looking towards the entry. Waterfall countertop is a buttermilk shade of Caesarstone.

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Since it’s visible from the entire home, they wanted to create a sleek kitchen that didn’t necessarily look like a kitchen. They chose white laminate glass for the backsplash, adding LED lighting behind it, so at night it would glow like the wine cabinet. Merz handled the tricky technical end of all that. The homeowners got the idea for floating shelves above the counter from the SieMatic showroom, where they purchased the cabinetry.

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View of the wine cabinet, and the pantry beyond. The pantry houses an extra oven, microwave, and extra storage for dishware.

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ACTWO designed built-ins for the living room, finished in rosewood and white gloss laminate. The homeowners collect colorful glass pieces displayed on the floating shelves.

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The condo has a great city view, overlooking the Boston Common.

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Since the homeowners are empty nesters, the two other bedrooms are his and hers offices, which also function as guest rooms.

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More great built ins; note the vertically-oriented cubbies for the books.

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The homeowners on the cover of the 2013 Globe Magazine Kitchens & Baths issue.
Read more about them and the project in my article “Beauty and the Bottle.

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Design Diary: A Boston Patio Inspired by Majorelle Gardens

Another oldie but goodie from the Boston Globe Magazine archives. In October 2009, I wrote “Kind of Blue,” about a Beacon Hill patio redesigned for outdoor entertaining, inspired by the homeowner’s trip to Morocco; Majorelle Gardens to be exact. This well-traveled 50-something hired Brian Feehan to transform her 10-by-17-foot outdoor space when she returned from her trip. He wondered how he would cram a 20-foot reflecting pool in there, but with a flair for the dramatic (Feehan is actually a director and choreographer), he managed to eke out a bit of paradise in the historic neighborhood.

I N S P I R A T I O N 
Jardin Majorelle   •   Marrakech

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Majorelle Garden was designed by the painter Jacques Majorelle in 1924 and revived by fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent and his partner, Pierre Berge, in 1980. Feehan took cues from the distinctive cobalt blue accent color, Moorish latticework, lush greenery, and fountain.

B E A C O N  H I L L  P A T I O
Designed by Brian Feehan

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Feehan replaced the existed rotted wood deck with a mahogany-stained ipe deck and painted the existing lattice matte black. He added a trio of of 6-inch-wide horizontal wood strips in cobalt blue around the perimeter. The slats add color, and the homeowner can hang votives and flowerpots from them.

For additional interest and color, Feehan hung a pair of antique Chinese doors found at SoWa showroom Mohr & McPherson. The scale and shape mimic the French doors on the opposite wall, and provide a focal point when one steps onto the patio from the house.

The blue mosaic tile you see in the background is a fountain. More about that below. Look closely, there are mirrors on either side of it, which extend the feel of the space.

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Feehan created a mosaic glass tile wall fountain that’s eight-feet high.  Water runs down the surface, which is covered with tiles in different sizes and thicknesses. It’s uplit, creating a glistening, otherworldly effect in the evening, and sounds lovely too. The water collects at the bottom in a cobalt-colored trough that runs the length of the brick wall.

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Moroccan style tiles are affixed to the gate, adding more flavor.

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The patio is accessed from the condo by French doors.
Don’t you wish she’d invite you to a cocktail party?

B E F O R E 

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It’s time to wear your espadrilles!
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Design Diary: Erin Gates’ Parents’ Connecticut Garden

When I’m looking for specific types homes to pitch to magazines, I send emails to my design contacts. When I’m looking for gardens for the Boston Globe Magazine gardens issue, I expand my reach to friends. Not being what you’d call a green thumb (ha), my landscape design contacts are hardly far and wide. We scout and shoot a year ahead, so if you have New England gardens to suggest, send me snapshots!

This year I wrote about three gardens, including designer/Elements of Style blogger Erin Gates’ parents’ gorgeous garden in rural Connecticut. I was psyched when she sent me photos and that the editors liked them. We loved that her mom works on the entire thing herself, tractor and all. She’s so sweet and humble about it; it’s really beautiful. Erin’s dad designed the house and her mom designs and tends the various gardens and plantings around the property.

The story is called, “Down in the Meadow” if you want to read it. Here are lots of pictures, including ones that weren’t published. All photography by Sarah Winchester.

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To see the flowers in my garden
follow StyleCarrot on Instagram

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Want more flowers?
Shop 500+ floral pieces at Shopbop.

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Design Diary: Color Theory Brings a Suburban House to Life

Boston-based interior designers Brad Dufton and Kendra Amin-Dufton, the husband and wife duo behind Color Theory (of Apartment Therapy Small Small Cool fame), recently finished a top-to-bottom project on a house in Winchester, which I wrote about for the Boston Globe Magazine. The story, “Against the Gray,” details the process of and relationship between the designers and clients on their journey in creating a color-filled home. Note that Color Theory did it entirely from retail sources, so if you’re interested, re-creating the look is within easy reach.

Living Room Designed By Color Theory

 Photo by Michael J. Lee

Funnily enough, although the clients wanted color, Brad went with gray paint throughout the house. It makes a great backdrop for the saturated furnishings. Above, in the formal living room, he used a relatively dark shade, Benjamin Moore “Rock Gray.”  Brad says, “Formal spaces benefit from darker colors; it decompresses your energy, makes you want to stay longer for conversation.” This is one of three rooms in the house that he tags as moody.

Indian rug from Mohr & McPherson in Boston;  “Fillmore” sofa from Thrive; barley twist chairs from Zimman’s near Boston, upholstered in “Prospect” ikat by Thom Filicia for Kravet; starburst mirror from Zimman’s; coffee table from Horchow.

Farmily Room Designed By Color Theory

The family room, above and below, is huge. The walls are a lighter gray, Benjamin Moore “Wales Gray.” (By the way, Brad started out as a professional painter; he swears by and only uses Benjamin Moore, preferring its Regal Select line with a matte finish.) They used a three-dimensional, dried black lava stone tile for the fireplace surround. He calls the handmade, Brazilian chevron cowhide rug, from PureRugs, a “god-like” material, saying, “Everything and anything washes out of it.” Chairs from Circle Furniture; trio of acrylic tables from Wayfair.

Farmily Room Designed By Color Theory

A 14-foot-long Flexform sofa from Showroom in Boston dominates the main portion of the family room. Thomas H. Little Upholstery in Southboro, MA crafted the round ottomans and throw pillows. As for the juju hat installation, the client, who is from Congo, had the orange one. Brad and Kendra asked her to bring back “as many as she could carry” went she went to Africa to visit her mom. They admit they had no idea what they’d do with them all, but in a fit of inspiration, they clustered them on the wall

Sunroom Designed By Color Theory

Photo by Michael J. Lee

The sunroom boasts an amazing collection of indoor/outdoor pieces by Paolo Lenti from Montage in Boston. The sofa is actually three individual chairs that can be moved around (or dragged out to the deck). They originally purchased the ensemble for the basement playroom, but in an Aha! moment, Kendra realized they’d be perfect for the sunroom. The indoor/outdoor rug was a steal for $150 at RugsUSA, a welcome addition after the splurge on furniture. Continuing the high/low mix, there’s also a “Martini” side table from West Elm and a trio of cage pendants from CB2.

Lighting Designed by Color Theory

In the stairwell, nine brass and stainless steel pendants with rope cords and Thomas Edison filament bulbs by Lunabella, purchased at Zimman’s. We hear the electrician was none too pleased to have to hang them all.

Lighting Designed by Color Theory

Bedroom Designed by Color Theory
Photo by Michael J. Lee

The master bedroom is done in a glamorous scheme of black and magenta, with Benjamin Moore “Rock Gray” on the walls. The bed, which the clients first saw in an apartment they rented in Paris, is B&B Italia by Max Aalto, purchased from  Montage in Boston. It’s black-stained wood, with a gray tweed upholstered headboard and platform. The ottoman is West Elm and the ikat rug from Wayfair.  The Horchow fainting chaise came in gray velvet, but Brad and Kendra had it reupholstered in a magenta fabric by Iman for Kravet that they’d had their eyes on for years.

Boudoir Designed By Color Theory
 Photo by Michael J. Lee

The client was hot for a vanity. Brad and Kendra couldn’t find one they loved, so they pieced together its components using the Jonathan Adler “Channing” console, an inexpensive acrylic chair, curvy “Cattaneo” mirror from Horchow, and chrome sconces with black shades from Lamps Plus. I love the Senegalese storage basket from Serena & Lily, presumably used as a hamper.

Bathroom Designed By Color Theory

The master bath is done with a 3D tile on the floor, inspired by Manhattan bathrooms of the 1920s, and staggered oversize marble tiles on the wall. The egg-shaped tub was a splurge, and caused a bit of a ruckus with the plumber, but they finally got it right.

color-theory-nursery-michael-lee
 Photo by Michael J. Lee

The client, pictured here, is expecting a baby. Luckily, they were able to use all the pieces from her now two-year-old’s nursery from their prior home to create a new gender-neutral nursery. The walls are a grayish blue, Benjamin Moore “Sterling.”  The chartreuse lacquer dresser is the “Latitude” from CB2, the sleeper sofa from Room & Board, and the crib is Stokke. The stuffed animals are from Africa and the animal photographs purchased online from The Animal Print Shop, finished in frames by Room & Board. The chevron rug was created from FLOR carpet tiles. The cuckoo clocks over the crib were Brad & Kendra’s (you may recognize them from their living room), purchased a while back for 99 cents each at Urban Outfitters.

Guest Room Designed By Color Theory

The guest room, above and below, is done in the punchy black and white “Feather Fan” wallpaper by Cole & Son. “Wood Tiled” whitewashed dresser from West Elm; assorted carpet tiles by FLOR.

Guest Room Designed By Color Theory

“Window” headboard from West Elm and “English Garden” comforter set from Target.

Color Theory Girls Bedroom Boho

Finally, the daughter’s bedroom is done with a hippie chic, boho bibe, in a slight departure from the rest of the house. Brad says, “I want her to feel like she is carried to a far away land when she steps in.”

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Shop Serena & Lily for beautiful kids’ rooms. 

Serena & Lily Girls Bedrooms

Shop stylish sofas at Dwell Studio

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Filed under . REGULAR FEATURES, Design Diary

Style Right Now: 25 Street Looks with Oxford Shoes

More street shots today, but this time it’s street style. The weather’s been gorgeous, springlike. Too hot for boots, too chilly for flip flops. I’m thinking of opting for oxfords. I love the look; oxford shoes are very Lucky mag. We did a roundup in the Boston Globe Magazine in February. Of course, I bought a a pair. Haven’t stepped out in them yet. Hmm… maybe tomorrow, I’ll pull it together. Here are 25 street style photographs of women rocking oxford shoes. I’ve snuck in some celebs —Elisabeth Olsen, Taylor Swift, and Alexa Chung (in great big red ones). And is that an Olsen twin first up?  Buy a pair for yourself! SHOPPING: Get the Look: 25 Oxford Shoes

oxfords-bike

oxfords-skirt

oxfords-shorts-tweed-blazer

black-oxfords-gray-sweater-blouse

blue-oxfords-elizabeth-olsen

taylor-swift-oxfords-varsity-jacket

oxfords-stripes-yellow-handbag

oxfords-with-yellow-sole

metallic-silver-oxfords-tweed-blazer

oxfords-green-tights-stole

tan-oxfords-boyfriend-jeans

oxblood-oxford

oxfords-black-skinnies

oxfords-leopard-print-blazer

oxfords-shift-dress

oxfords-rr-tracks

oxfords-black-tote-black-skinnies

oxfords-leopard-coat-leather-skinnies

oxfords-leggomgs-tee

oxfords-sullen-girl

gold-oxfords-white-denim

leopard-oxfords-scarf-bag

oxfords & jeans - photo by Seth Smoot

mark-sanders-oxfords

boston-globe-magazine-oxfords

Boston Globe MagazineFlat & Happy

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SHOP the LOOK

ALSO READ:  Get the Look: 25 Oxford Shoes

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Filed under . REGULAR FEATURES, Style Right Now