Tag Archives: Benjamin Moore

Design Diary: Boston Design Home’s Net Zero Energy House

Sunday is the last day to see Boston Magazine’s Design Home. This year, Design Home is a net-zero energy house, built, owned, and soon to be lived in, by real people. Homeowners Natalie and Tom Treat, along with Ridgeview Construction and National Grid, collaborated with Design Home to promote awareness of energy efficient design and raise money for Boston Children’s Hospital. (Tickets are $25, all of which goes to Boston Children’s Hospital.)

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The 2,400-square foot, single-family home in Salisbury, Massachusetts is a brand new modular construction designed by BrightBuilt Home. It features energy efficient building techniques and systems, as well as eco-friendly finishes and furnishings, all from local sources, overseen by architectural and interior designer Lisa Sivan Wasserman.

It’s the last weekend to take the tour and see the whole thing in person. Here’s a preview of some of the spaces, along with decor details you won’t find anywhere else. (I wrote all the copy for the Design House again this year, so I’ve got plenty of extra scoop. If you’re more interested in the energy efficiency aspect, let me know, as I’ve got a lot of information on that as well, and can direct you to the experts.)

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In the entry, gray slate tile bridges the exterior and interior and requires minimum maintenance. Sunlight streams through the cut in the family room wall. The elephant mahogany console table on curvilinear steel base, is by Ray Bachand of 60nobscot, and the vintage rug is from Landry & Arcari, which provided the rugs in every room.  The Walsingham Gallery in Newburyport provided the artwork throughout the house, often done by local artists depicting local subjects. This seascape in oil is by Robert Bolster.

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To the right, the reclaimed antique wood bench with sleek acrylic legs is also from 60nobscot. Low VOC paint from Benjamin Moore was used throughout.

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Lynn Dayton of Dayton Home, a home furnishings shop in Wellesley, decorated the family room. Dayton was inspired by natural woods, minerals, grasses and stone. She used natural linen on the windows to reflect the commitment to organic. Plus, they allow for privacy but also light and heat.  (Dayton supplied the fabrics for the window treatments, which were sewn by Adorna, a local to the trade custom workroom.)  Sofa is by Wesley Hall and glass table lamp Arteriors Home.

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The sunroom was an add-on that will make the Treats feel like they’re in the New Hampshire woods, right in their backyard. Low maintenance indoor/outdoor furniture from Yankee Fireplace. I love the unfinished beadboard cathedral ceiling.

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The upstairs palette is much lighter, and the vibe more relaxed. A vegetable-dyed, hand-spun wool rug in seafoam green with a terracotta lotus tree pattern from Landry & Arcari provides soft color on the floor. The reclaimed wood flooring throughout was supplied by Jewett Farms + Co. Upstairs they used wide planks of live sawn old growth white oak. The landscape paintings, Darlou Gams‘ diptych “Morning” and “Breezing Marsh,” reinforce the dreamy feel, and a pair of vintage rattan stools found on eBay add texture.

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The child’s bedroom, designed by Emily Lacouture of NOW Interiors, a design studio and retail shop in Acton, is playful and sophisticated. The patchwork quilt with animal spine pattern is handmade by a RISD-trained artist Meg Callahan. The stump side table is locally made chainsaw art by Vermont craftsman Barre Pinske and the wooly llama foot stool is by Eli Parker. The life size baby giraffe sculpture by Ocean Sole is made out of flip flops retrieved and recycled from the beaches of Kenya.

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On the other side of the room, an abstract cityscape by Boston artist Beatrice Dauge-Kaufman and an on-trend polished copper spotlight sits on a glossy black console.

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LaCouture also decorated the guest room, in which she used a hand-painted 1960s vintage folding screen from France as a headboard. The reclaimed wood bench at the foot of the bed is an nice juxtaposition to the smooth pale wood Fan chair by Tom Dixon, which is a contemporary take on the classic Windsor chair. That chunky, handknit throw is delicious.

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The master bedroom palette is soft and soothing. Kerry Vaughan of Red Bird Trading Company in Newburyport decorated the room, using a statement making, Phillip Jeffries Driftwood grasscloth-covered four-poster bed by Lee Industries as its centerpiece. A diamond quilted linen coverlet and white linens keeps the palette perfectly pared down, while a locally made linen throw with velvet backing, mohair and velvet throw pillows, and lamp shades custom made in Maine from marbleized paper add a touch of texture and color. The nailhead trim bench, covered in cotton velvet is also Lee Industries. The room is grounded by a wool and silk rib rug in a lustrous gray from Landry & Arcari.

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A narrow grasscloth covered console table doubles as a vanity, accessorized with a swirly distressed wood mirror.

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The children’s room and guest room share the spa-like blue and white bathroom that opens off the upstairs hall. The space saving vanity is from Peabody Supply Company; its bottom drawer and storage shelf supplement the narrow linen closet next to the shower. Accessories fromNOW Interiors, such as the rattan mirror and aqua striped Turkish towel reinforce the bath’s coastal vibe. Both this and the master bath feature radiant flooring, an energy saving alternative to baseboard heaters.

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Kerry Vaughan of Red Bird Trading conjured an artist’s atelier as inspiration. The décor, like that elsewhere in the home, draws from natural elements and sticks to the spirit of using locally made and reworked pieces. An extra long sectional by Lee Industries is upholstered in heavily textured, oyster white Belgian linen, and sits on an overdyed Turkish rug. Above is an industrial style raw brass light fixture.

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Under the eaves is a recycled cot from Maine, covered in cowhide.

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Another area features a drafting table.

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Coastal Windows & Exteriors provided the home’s triple pane argon windows, which reduce solar gain from the sun in summer and prevent heat from escaping in winter. The 27 Sunbug Solar panels on the roof will generate at least as much power as the home uses each year. The Treats expect to have saved enough on energy bills to compensate for the cost of their panels within four to five years. An electric circuit monitor by PowerWise will gather data about how much electric the home’s lighting, appliances, etc. consumes, so they can analyze where to cut back and where waste might be occurring.

Michael J. Lee Photography

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S H O P  the P O S T

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Design Diary: Sunshine-y House on the Bass River

I was very excited when photographer Dan Cutrona sent my photos of this Cape Cod cottage in South Yarmouth, which was featured in Boston Globe Magazine earlier this month.. It’s one of my favorites, and it has a swing. The all white space, punctuated with pops of yellow, is home to Newburyport-based landscape designer Trent Lloyd, and was decorated by her sister, North Carolina-based Alys S. Protzman of Alys Design. The decorating was done on a budget, which wasn’t too much of a challenge given that Lloyd favors on rustic simplicity.

Originally built for a sea captain in town and relocated to the banks of the Bass River in about 1899, the house was dark and cramped. Sticking to a white palette accented with yellow (Benjamin Moore “Bright Yellow,” to be exact), along with a few new upholstered pieces and plenty of secondhand finds, Protzman transformed the cottage into a happy summer retreat. The view is incredible; they can see the kids, who take sailing lessons, breeze by in the afternoons. The sliders open to a wide stair and brick patio.

Cape Cottage WIth Living Room Swing

Protzman’s sister and brother-in-law have three daughters, ages 9, 7 , and 4. The kid on the swing is the only boy cousin out of ten grandchildren. “There’s a lot of female energy around here,” she says. As for taking turns, each kid gets 20 swings before having to pass it on to the next. She adds, “It’s a fun way to keep the kids entertained during cocktail hour.” Protzman’s husband, who’s a woodworker, built the swing, and she painted it.

A cotton rag rug from a store in the Florida Panhandle covers the pickled white floors. The original floors were painted black with splatters of white paint. Seriously. They stripped them, and had to patch certain areas because the wood got so worn down. They stained the floorboards white rather than painting them. Protzman says, “The stain goes into the wood, so you’re less likely to see scratches; it’s more durable. Also rather than a monolithic white, it’s very beachy and driftwood-y, with a bit of warmth.”

The Restoration Hardware sofas are upholstered in an outdoor fabric by Perennials Outdoors, that feels like washed linen. Protzman commissioned an Etsy maker in France to create linen pillows with painted yellow circles. A carpenter for the contractor, LaBarge Homes, built the coffee table from reclaimed barn wood, and the tiny chairs came from the local swap shop. The table in the corner is a primitive, folk art style. Their mom jokes that it looks like it fell off a boat a hundred years ago.

A plain bulb fixture from Schoolhouse Electric dangles low, just above the side table, It’s an orangey yellow. Protzman says, “The yellows didn’t match perfectly in places, which Lloyd was a little concerned about it, but I think it adds depth; you don’t want to be too matchy matchy.”

White Living Room WIth Yellow Accents

Protzman arranged four swivel chairs around an old telephone cable spool used as a coffee table. She says, “It’s been a hit. You can swivel to the kitchen, or watch the sunset with your feet up; the setup allows for total flexibility, and the kids like to spin on them.” The idea grew out of not wanting a sofa backing up to the either the dining room or the kitchen.. She adds, “It might become my calling card. I’m so sick of pushing furniture against walls.”

Country Style All White Kitchen WIth Pops Of Yellow

In the kitchen, unfinished stools, $30 each from Amazon, got the same Benjamin Moore “Bright Yellow” paint as the lower bank of cabinetry (they kept the existing but swapped the hardware). The laminate counters were replaced with Silestone. Open shelving replaced upper cabinetry, hung against whitewashed shiplap, a material also used in the upstairs hallway. The carpenter built the freestanding Parsons-style island with IKEA butcher-block top. “It requires maintenance to avoid stains and cut marks,” says Protzman, “but my sister is fine with what she calls ‘texture’ in a summer house.” The vintage warehouse pendant is from Etsy.

Mixed Dining Room Seating In Cape Cottage

Protzman says that in trying to figure out what to do with this long and skinny space, they realized they could make it work as a dining room that would function as a multi-use space, for puzzles and projects too.

Lloyd wanted mix-and match-chair look. Protzman says, “It’s an arty collection of odd chairs.” Some are weighty; some minimal. There’s painted metal, chrome, and white leather, plus slipcovered pieces. The slipcovered bench from Serena & Lily is on casters, and seats two. Protzman found three painted blue ,metal chairs for $45 each at Scott’s, an antique mall  in Atlanta. The blue is the only other color introduced in the house.

Jeff Soderbergh, a Wellfleet-based woodworker, designed the 17-foot long dining table. It’s made out of board called “king’s wood” found in the home’s attic. (“King’s wood” boards were wide, choice planks saved to send back to the King, way back when.) Soderbergh didn’t sand the 15-inch wide boards, which were originally hand-planed, so the top is not perfectly flat. The natural curvature of the boards, the knots, and somebody’s hand-carved initials, were all left intact.

Since it’s just two-inches thick, he added an apron front for the illusion of heft. Lloyd loved the idea of doing an industrial leg, so Soderbergh sourced old, cast iron factory legs that say “Boston “on them, powder coated in white. The table was assembled on site; it took seven guys to carry the three sets of legs.

All White Cape Cod Cottage Stairway

Yellow And White Striped Tile Bathroom

This was originally a powder room with dead space, so they made it into an indoor beach shower. Lloyd and her husband are tri-athletes, so they made it into a steam shower. It’s large enough for the whole family and has a bench in there. As for the yellow and white striped tile design, Protzman says, “I thought we would put in a tiny touch of the nautical,; it reminds me of a sail.”

Yellow & White Living Room WIth Swing

During the renovation they added three sets of sliders to the exterior wall, really opening it to the outdoors. They replaced the windows over the sofa, but stuck to the traditional six-over-six configuration.

Capde Cod Cottage On The Bass River

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Design Diary: Color Theory Brings a Suburban House to Life

Boston-based interior designers Brad Dufton and Kendra Amin-Dufton, the husband and wife duo behind Color Theory (of Apartment Therapy Small Cool fame in 2009), recently finished a top-to-bottom project on a house in Winchester, which I wrote about for the Boston Globe Magazine. The story, “Against the Gray,” details the process of and relationship between the designers and clients on their journey in creating a color-filled home. Note that Color Theory did it entirely from retail sources, so if you’re interested, re-creating the look is within easy reach.

Living Room Designed By Color Theory

 Photo by Michael J. Lee

Funnily enough, although the clients wanted color, Brad went with gray paint throughout the house. It makes a great backdrop for the saturated furnishings. Above, in the formal living room, he used a relatively dark shade, Benjamin Moore “Rock Gray.”  Brad says, “Formal spaces benefit from darker colors; it decompresses your energy, makes you want to stay longer for conversation.” This is one of three rooms in the house that he tags as moody.

Indian rug from Mohr & McPherson in Boston;  “Fillmore” sofa from Thrive; barley twist chairs from Zimman’s near Boston, upholstered in “Prospect” ikat by Thom Filicia for Kravet; starburst mirror from Zimman’s; coffee table from Horchow.

Farmily Room Designed By Color Theory

The family room, above and below, is huge. The walls are a lighter gray, Benjamin Moore “Wales Gray.” (By the way, Brad started out as a professional painter; he swears by and only uses Benjamin Moore, preferring its Regal Select line with a matte finish.) They used a three-dimensional, dried black lava stone tile for the fireplace surround. He calls the handmade, Brazilian chevron cowhide rug, from PureRugs, a “god-like” material, saying, “Everything and anything washes out of it.” Chairs from Circle Furniture; trio of acrylic tables from Wayfair.

Farmily Room Designed By Color Theory

A 14-foot-long Flexform sofa from Showroom in Boston dominates the main portion of the family room. Thomas H. Little Upholstery in Southboro, MA crafted the round ottomans and throw pillows. As for the juju hat installation, the client, who is from Congo, had the orange one. Brad and Kendra asked her to bring back “as many as she could carry” went she went to Africa to visit her mom. They admit they had no idea what they’d do with them all, but in a fit of inspiration, they clustered them on the wall

Sunroom Designed By Color Theory

Photo by Michael J. Lee

The sunroom boasts an amazing collection of indoor/outdoor pieces by Paolo Lenti from Montage in Boston. The sofa is actually three individual chairs that can be moved around (or dragged out to the deck). They originally purchased the ensemble for the basement playroom, but in an Aha! moment, Kendra realized they’d be perfect for the sunroom. The indoor/outdoor rug was a steal for $150 at RugsUSA, a welcome addition after the splurge on furniture. Continuing the high/low mix, there’s also a “Martini” side table from West Elm and a trio of cage pendants from CB2.

Lighting Designed by Color Theory

In the stairwell, nine brass and stainless steel pendants with rope cords and Thomas Edison filament bulbs by Lunabella, purchased at Zimman’s. We hear the electrician was none too pleased to have to hang them all.

Lighting Designed by Color Theory

Bedroom Designed by Color Theory
Photo by Michael J. Lee

The master bedroom is done in a glamorous scheme of black and magenta, with Benjamin Moore “Rock Gray” on the walls. The bed, which the clients first saw in an apartment they rented in Paris, is B&B Italia by Max Aalto, purchased from  Montage in Boston. It’s black-stained wood, with a gray tweed upholstered headboard and platform. The ottoman is West Elm and the ikat rug from Wayfair.  The Horchow fainting chaise came in gray velvet, but Brad and Kendra had it reupholstered in a magenta fabric by Iman for Kravet that they’d had their eyes on for years.

Boudoir Designed By Color Theory
 Photo by Michael J. Lee

The client was hot for a vanity. Brad and Kendra couldn’t find one they loved, so they pieced together its components using the Jonathan Adler “Channing” console, an inexpensive acrylic chair, curvy “Cattaneo” mirror from Horchow, and chrome sconces with black shades from Lamps Plus. I love the Senegalese storage basket from Serena & Lily, presumably used as a hamper.

Bathroom Designed By Color Theory

The master bath is done with a 3D tile on the floor, inspired by Manhattan bathrooms of the 1920s, and staggered oversize marble tiles on the wall. The egg-shaped tub was a splurge, and caused a bit of a ruckus with the plumber, but they finally got it right.

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 Photo by Michael J. Lee

The client, pictured here, is expecting a baby. Luckily, they were able to use all the pieces from her now two-year-old’s nursery from their prior home to create a new gender-neutral nursery. The walls are a grayish blue, Benjamin Moore “Sterling.”  The chartreuse lacquer dresser is the “Latitude” from CB2, the sleeper sofa from Room & Board, and the crib is Stokke. The stuffed animals are from Africa and the animal photographs purchased online from The Animal Print Shop, finished in frames by Room & Board. The chevron rug was created from FLOR carpet tiles. The cuckoo clocks over the crib were Brad & Kendra’s (you may recognize them from their living room), purchased a while back for 99 cents each at Urban Outfitters.

Guest Room Designed By Color Theory

The guest room, above and below, is done in the punchy black and white “Feather Fan” wallpaper by Cole & Son. “Wood Tiled” whitewashed dresser from West Elm; assorted carpet tiles by FLOR.

Guest Room Designed By Color Theory

“Window” headboard from West Elm and “English Garden” comforter set from Target.

Color Theory Girls Bedroom Boho

Finally, the daughter’s bedroom is done with a hippie chic, boho bibe, in a slight departure from the rest of the house. Brad says, “I want her to feel like she is carried to a far away land when she steps in.”

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Shop Serena & Lily for beautiful kids’ rooms. 

Serena & Lily Girls Bedrooms

Shop stylish sofas at Dwell Studio

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Get the Look: 72 Green Home Furnishings

The biggest round-up yet: 72 items in all sorts of lovely shades of green. Lighting, wallpaper, chairs, tables , beds, vases, pillows, rugs, racks, kitchen stuff, and more. I sneaked in a few fashion accessories and jewelry too.

S H O P P I N G

Tank Suspension Light by Alexander Taylor, $1110 at YLighting.
Rubber Vase by Henriette Melchiorsenv for Menu, $23.95 at Fjorn.
Wishbone Chair by Hans Wegner for Carl Hansen, $726.75 at DWR.
Salix Wallpaper, $148 at Anthropologie.
LACK Side Table, $7.99 at IKEA.
Hang On Rack by Normann Copenhagen $96 at The Future Perfect.
Streamliner Classic Wood Car, $47.50 at Fjorn.
Benjamin Moore Lawn Green Paint, $36.95 at West Elm.
Link Task Light by Peter Stathis, $323 at Design Public.
Scheherazade Headboard by Ceylon Portfolio, $1,150 at Dering Hall.
Kastehelmi Dewdrop Bowl by Oiva Toikka for Iittala , $19 at Didrik’s.
Grams 16″ Pillow, $59.95 at CB2.
Key Modular Storage by Scott Bennett for Housefish, $734 at Design Public.
Turquoise Quercus Ring by Lucifer Vir Honestus, $6,400 at Barneys.
Future Vase by Holmegaard , $65 at Fjorn.
Ming Green Steel Side Chair, $199 at Crate & Barrel.
Arrow Hanger by Design House, $39.98 at Fjorn.
FREDRIKA Fabric, $6.99/yard at IKEA.
Baker Sofa by Finn Juhl, Onecollection, $14,620 at DWR.
Banana Leaf Wastebasket by Gail DeLoach, $95 at Gracious Home.
Binic Table Lamp by Ionna Vautrin for Foscarini, $289 at Ylighting.
Untitled #4 by Matthew Tischler (30×40 print), $2400 at 20×200.
Claire Faux Bamboo Mirror by Bungalow 5 $640 at Clayton Gray.
Mandala Rug by Madeline Weinrib at Madeline Weinrib.
Franklin Credenza by Christopher Kennedy, $9600 at Dering Hall.
Ibis Bird by Oiva Toikka for Iittala, $595 at Didrik’s.
Green Balance Steel Ceiling Mobile, $399 at Nova68.
Jacqui Side Table by Bungalow 5, $420 at Clayton Gray.
Scalloped Headboard, $1,100 at Decorator Tag Sale.
Clothes Tree by P’kolino, $109 at Design Public.
Nixon 4 -Piece Setting, $50 at Jonathan Adler.
SOMNAT Crib, $79.99 at IKEA.
Velvet Arm Chairs at Galerie Andre Hayat, 1st Dibs.
Ere-be-Dragons Wallpaper for Paper Boy, $125 at Vertigo Home.
Pitcher by Anu Penttinen for Marimekko, $89 at Crate & Barrel.
Stretch Stool by Jessica Carnevale, $295 at MoMA Store.
Grass Vase by Claydies for Normann Copenhagen, $45 at Vertigo Home.
Acrylic Box by Baron Alessandro Albrizzi, $190 at Moss.
Zebra Llama Wool Rug, $995 at Jonathan Adler.
Tennyson X-Stool by Arteriors Home $775 at Clayton Gray.
Templeton Twin Bed, $2,795 at Jonathan Adler.
Chrysoprase/Diamond Necklace by Irene Neuwirth, $20,100 at Barneys.
Doodle Dog Pillow by Crypton, $40 at Design Public.
Herb Scissors, $9.95 at Chef Tools.
Unikko Tray by Marimekko, $39 at FinnStyle.
Rollerstop by Harry Allen for Areaware, $199 at Fitzsu.
Cheeky Ikat Organic Cotton Pillow Cover, $50 at Fabricadabra.
Walnut Vessel With Green Trim by Matt Pugh, $62 at Gretel Home.
Gorilla Pillow by Ross Menuez for Fauna, $28 at Design Public.
Elan Wedges by Diane von Furstenberg, $395 at Net-a-Porter.
Fluted Contrast Mug by Royal Copenhagen, €20 at Royal Copenhagen.
Grass Flocked Terracotta Pig Bank, $20 at The W Hotels Store.
Silicone Trivet by Sagaform Sweden, $7.95 at Fjorn.
Circles Placemat by Daisy Hill Linens, $58 at Barneys.
POÄNG Birch Veneer Chair, $129 at IKEA.
Tron Sofa by Richard Shemtov, , $4,970 at Dering Hall.
BARNSLIG Mirror, $19.99 at IKEA.
Reed Cover Chair, $149 at CB2.
Raw Candelabra by Jens Fager for Muuto, $250 at A+R.
Suede Passenger Clutch, $78 at Madewell.
Richard Nixon Baby Alpaca Throw, $295 at Jonathan Adler.
Chilewich Spun Grass Placemat, $52/set of 4 at Design Public.
BLOMMIG Vase, $3.99 at IKEA.
Aalto 3.75″ Vase by Alvar Aalto for Iittala, $85 at Fjorn.
BILLY Bookcase with Glass Doors, $79.99 at IKEA.
Taboret Stool/Side Table, $325 at Hudson.
Collapsible Silicone Funnel, $10.49 at Useful Things.
Aquinnah  Cotton Rug by Dash & Albert, $30—$414 at Dash & Albert.
Edge of Belgravia Ceramic Knives, £34.90-£59.90 at Edge of Belgravia.
1970s Gooseneck Desk Lamp, $1,200 at Metropolis Modern, 1st Dibs.
Pear Screen Print by Enzo Mari, $480 at Nova68.
Jacqui 4-Drawer Chest by Bungalow 5, $1690 at Clayton Gray.

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